Abstract Animation with Jodie Mack | KQED Arts

Abstract Animation with Jodie Mack | KQED Arts


(relaxing music) – With the fabric that I use, I’m making these abstract films but hoping to sort of call attention to the relationship between fine art and sort of everyday decorative kitsch. (relaxing music) Hi, I’m Jodie Mack. I’m an experimental animator, time choreographer artist type. My aesthetic project with sort of defining the
relationship between fine art and everyday life concerning abstraction. Involves a lot of these
really bright fabrics. And oftentimes I’m considering these works sort of eulogies for these materials. It’s sort of the end of their life. It’s their last hurrah. So I make my movies on a
16 millimeter Bolex camera. I work in the zone of
stop motion animation. So, I take 24 photographs essentially for one second of onscreen time. This is sort of an older
method of making animations. A lot of things are done
on computers these days but I choose to work in film because the material
renders color and texture in a way that resonates
with a lot of my work ’cause I’m working a lot with very colorful
textured objects up close. It costs money to shoot film, so it allows me to stay
focused and work alone. Many computer animations are
made by thousands of people but I can just make everything myself. Now, experimental animation isn’t what you might normally
associate with animation. You might wanna think of it as more similar to plastic
arts like painting or sculpture than things like narrative filmmaking. Things like Symphonie
Diagonale by Viking Eggeling or work by Hans Richter, Lotte Reiniger, Oskar Fischinger, Len Lye, Harry Smith. Some of those are the formative experimental animation pioneers. Before I started out as a filmmaker, I started out in theater. So, early on, I had this sort
of upbringing, surrounding performing and building
things, building sets, making costumes, putting on a show. And then right at the end of
college, I just caught the bug and actually started working in cameraless filmmaking where everything’s very small and you’re using physical objects to place on the filmstrip frame by frame. That immediately sort of acquainted me with using recycled materials and things that I could find in multiple. Photo negatives and magazine cutouts and fabrics and posters and gift bags and envelopes and junk mail and things like that and
scraps and scraps of scraps. It just sort of grew from there, and so now each material sort of governs the theme of each piece. And then sometimes what’s discovered through studying them in
motion becomes a surprise too. I went down to Mexico and realized that I was obsessed with
the textiles down there, and that it would just make perfect sense for me to start animating with them, since I’ve animated with
a ton of other textiles. I met a great friend who
came from a rug weaving town and shot animations with him. Both of the rugs and a little
bit of the production involved with making the rugs. And then I gathered a
bunch of other textiles, and just started working with
shooting them in landscapes and in different elements of 3D space that could sort of maybe be anywhere. I intend to keep shooting them around, so I’m shooting them in
San Francisco right now. I hope to shoot them in
Los Angeles and Arizona and New Mexico and Texas. And, in some ways, I don’t even really know what will happen to the project. So it’s just I really wanna keep growing and keep adding skills or tool sets to my animation practice. For me, this is just a
way again to experiment. I’m just having fun with it. (fun music)

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *