Artists' Artist Paul Thek and Vito Acconci, Kenny Schachter UZH Art Market Studies

Artists' Artist Paul Thek and Vito Acconci, Kenny Schachter UZH Art Market Studies



I was always drawn to conceptual art and the artists that I got involved with in the very beginning of my career twenty-five years ago with the artists that I'm still very much involved with and have taught about and have written about but two artists for example are Vito akan she and Paul Tech there are two wildly different artists with very different trajectories in their career Paul tech died in the 80s in American artists lived most of his life in Europe that was before things were so he actually suffered because there was no internet there was no interconnectivity and what applied to Paul Tech's career is this notion of being out of sight is being out of mind Paul Tech had a great show in 1964 at Pace gallery and became a kind of mini celebrity in a tiny little universe because the art world was literally at that point in the 60s there were half a dozen contemporary art galleries in all of New York City and Paul Tech showed these pieces he made this fake meat or flesh out of wax and pigment and various different bits and pieces and he became very known for these works and then he picked up and moved to Europe stopped making the pieces that everyone identified with and just started living an itinerant life moving all over Europe showing throughout Europe in various biennials and making art with groups of other people he died destitute in poverty in 1988 when there was a gigantic bull market and there was only one little US institution in North Carolina that owned a single drawing otherwise there were no museums in America that supported his work Paul Tech made hundreds of absolutely beautiful paintings whether on canvas or newspaper where he frequently painted he was technically incredibly skillful at what he did so people today don't want to learn the process of doing they want to have it done for them I call it like instead of already made it's a habit made so people just want to pick up a phone book and make a phone call and get something fabricated rather than going through the effort of learning how to to draw from life or to draw a figure to draw a still lifes and then even this was an artist that was concept that was traditionally making very aesthetically beautiful works and also made crazy installations scatter pieces sculpture he never settled in the market embraces sameness and likes to affirm what's been affirmed before it he was too far ahead of his time which is which is worse than being behind the time which is how he suffered and Vito country was another story of he made I mean he's gone through a series of wild career transformations Vito con she used his body as his palette as his art supply and made videos where he manipulated his body and toyed with his body and did various provocations to himself so he was one of the lead he went from poetry to video art to performance art then he made sculpture and installation and from there he started to make public art because in America in various other places they have a percent for the arts in relationship to construction whether they're in new buildings going up in the city they have a statute that says one percent should go for that for art every time you build a new office tower so Vito country famously said he doesn't want the 1% he wants the 99% but Vito country went from masturbating under a floor in Ileana sauna Ben's gallery in New York City in 1972 to becoming a full-fledged industrial designer and architect and thankfully I mean I've been proselytize in about these people it's a travesty that people that have so moved my life that are largely responsible for my for my career in the art world because I was so moved intellectually and emotionally by the practice of for instance these two artists and neither of them are ever succeeded in the traditional sense of how we would define success in 2016

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