Composer Disasterpeace on video games, It Follows, and Under The Silver Lake

Composer Disasterpeace on video games, It Follows, and Under The Silver Lake



a friend of mine posted my music to a forum there was actually like a wanted ad for music for a cell phone game and he posted my music to this thread and he was like hey check this out and then I like followed up with the person who posted the ad and then like months later they got back to me and they're like hey actually we do need music do you want to write some for this like pretty smartphone era like cell phone game so it was like very sort of like primitive technology but I got to write music and make sound effects and I got paid and I was like 19 and I was like wow this is cool I never had like a strong intention like I'm gonna go into film I was always like I'm gonna work on games and then one day I kind of got pulled into it and so I'm like slowly sort of like finding my way I would say so it follows the director David Robert Mitchell he played the the game Fez that I scored back in 2012 and he really liked the music and so he emailed me I wasn't really sure about it like it was kind of it's kind of a weird to me and I didn't have a lot of contacts but once I saw his first movie misses the Americans sleepover I was really intrigued because that movie is so unlike any horror movie that I've ever seen it just made me really curious about what you know what his vision was and what he was gonna do for that when David was pitching Silverlake to me I think he just sent me the script to read and noticing all these sort of threads like I really like movies that have a lot of ambiguous content in them and are challenging because I think they reward repeated viewings and they get you to think about things it's kind of similar to the way I think about like tarot readings where we're like you you're given like a prompt to me it's like a prompt that gets you to like think about things in a new way I normally try to seek out projects where I'm pushing my boundaries a little bit and that was like a really big leap for me but luckily David had someone that he had worked with before his name is kyle new master who's a very talented experienced composure who's done a lot of work with orchestras and so we were you know we were involved from the beginning together I mean we had a 48 piece Orchestra it was actually more than that in terms of musicians because it's different musicians every day so or every session because the movie set in LA because it's so sort of multifaceted and ambitious in a certain sense I think he really saw it as like a an opportunity to pay homage to film and sort of the history of filmmaking and in the area is woven into the to the narrative of the movie and so having sort of a classic Hollywood affectation and the music was something that I think just made made a lot of sense there's a message in the music there are some pretty good music placements you know what I mean like like big songs especially when you watch the trailer you know Maryam yeah are you thinking about how it integrates with that kind of stuff or is it like no it stands alone yeah I mean it's all part of the sound world and sort of the narrative of the mute the movie not just sort of the classic Hollywood and certainly the noir vibes but also the the main characters sort of relationship to music you know they're sort of like a at least my my sense of them is sort of like a very old gen Xer or like a very young millennial who's like who's really sort of caught up in like you know early 90s like rock and stuff like that so that was always like in the back of my head when I was doing score but also you know when I was writing the the turning teeth track or anything really because we had a lot of different kinds of music that we had to do not just score we also had to you know do that song as I said but also there's there sequences in the film there's a there's an arrangement of to Sir with love that we had to write for like a quartet and yeah it's it's all it's interesting because it's different you want it to stand apart from the score but it's all sort of like referencing the same sort of world the score has a really fun job in this movie it does a lot of foreshadowing it acknowledges you know a lot of the threads that sort of unravel as Sam the main character sort of goes deeper and deeper into this mystery you'll hear you know motifs that like reference different characters that you haven't met yet this is sort of the references to videogames in the movie and sort of like this you know the the the secrets that you know kids would try to uncover when they were playing games in the 80s like Legend of Zelda and you had to like you know figure stuff out with pen and paper there's certainly a lot of composers and and scores that that inspired me especially earlier on in my career I think about someone like like Koji Kondo and in video games who did you know Zelda and Mario and all those games just just just a sort of diversity of his output and like his abilities sort of like move between different styles I and just the quality of his work was always really inspiring or someone like Yost annoy Matsuda who did Chrono Cross and Chrono Trigger which are RPGs just his his ability to sort of like riff on and be inspired by music from other cultures in the way that he plays with harmony and like rhythms and was always really inspiring to me for me I found what keeps me inspired is treating every project as its own thing and being open to working in different mediums and different genres and just trying to interface with new ideas and new things and you know keep try to keep it interesting under the silver leg

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