In the Shadows: artists struggle to keep art of Chinese shadow puppetry alive

In the Shadows: artists struggle to keep art of Chinese shadow puppetry alive



these artists truly shine when they're hiding in the shadows inside this Beijing classroom tales of conflict come to light to the delight of the young audience this is the art of Chinese shadow puppetry where masters expertly maneuver figures on a translucent screen but its popularity is fading as it competes against modern forms of entertainment like TV and video games that worries Liu ba-bong he comes from a family that created one of Beijing's old schools of shadow theater the future development of the art relies on the younger generations the hope is on them this art won't have hope without giving hope to young people one troupe in Beijing has managed to survive it's made up of about 60 puppeteers with dwarfism like Jing Jing Qin he had struggled to find work now Jing has found his passion by building these characters from scratch his chances on food freedom I'm very happy during the process of carving worn leather into a work of art I charged them so deeply that they're just like my babies but the troops founder is concerned about the future I'm very worried because in ten years our old artisans who are already in their 70s and 80s will no longer be able to perform on stage puppeteers have looked for new ways to attract audiences such as incorporating modern themes local governments have also pitched in to help keep the art alive puppeteers say audiences can also do their part by spreading the word shadowplay can teach us knowledge and values it's also very interesting – ahjusshi an ancient art rich in cultural history and tradition a treasure from the past these artists hope won't fade away Francisco cgta

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