Inspirational artist P. Thomas Wood

Inspirational artist P. Thomas Wood


– [Voiceover] This is an
AMI This Week Short Cut. – [Voiceover] I’m Grant
Hardy for Accessible Media. In January 2007, P. Thomas
Wood was driving to work when he was injured
in a car crash. At first, he didn’t think
his injuries were too serious but soon after found
out he had sustained a traumatic brain injury
and lost vision in one eye. After the accident,
Patrick was no longer able to work as a teacher
and turned to art as part of his therapy. – One of the things
I loved was teaching, but teaching was always
a means to an end for me to become an
artist in the long run. The problem is that you gotta
be careful what you wish for, because sometimes
your wishes come true, but they’re not exactly
the way you wanted them. I should’ve put
into the equation, “I want to be an artist
but without a car accident “and a head injury.” – [Voiceover] P.
Thomas Wood has done thousands of paintings,
and in one series, he has incorporated safety
pins, nails, or matchbooks. The title of that
series is, Safety Last. In one painting,
the bright colors hide behind the safety pins, which were placed in
different directions, while another had colorful nails
sticking out of the canvas, which were filled with
colorful circles and lines. It isn’t every day I can explore
a painting with my hands, but this series was
definitely very tactile. Art means so much
to so many people, and in so many different ways, P. Thomas Wood has
always believed art doesn’t answer
questions, it just asks more. – [P. Thomas] Art
always has this ideal on the other side of it, where people want to
be famous and rich, and, you know, live
a life of splendor. I’m much more attuned
to my little world, where art helps me
focus what I need to, find inside of myself what
I can’t quite find in words. – [Voiceover] Speaking of words, P. Thomas Wood had a hard time finding words and thoughts
after his accident. Not only did art help
him, watching AMI did too. – AMI helped me with described
video probably the most. I had problems with recognizing people’s emotions on their face, or face recognition is
what it’s referred to as. I used to stumble with that. I could look at people, and
they could be talking to me, but I couldn’t see, you know,
there’s so many emotions that come from people’s faces. Shows like Corner Gas were
extremely helpful to me in the very beginning, because
I could look at the show, somebody would
describe it to me, and I could measure
between what I perceived and what was going on with
the person describing. So it was invaluable. – [Voiceover] One
thing P. Thomas Wood has taken away from his
accident is being patient, in life and in his recovery. – We tend to be impatient after something
has happened to us, and we expect ourselves to
get better or heal quicker. I was no different. And I think that’s probably
what I can see in hindsight now, is that allowing yourself
to have the time to adapt, because human beings
are extremely adaptable, and having the time to adapt allows you to get your
feet under yourself and allows you to find that
kind of survival instinct that we all have inside of us. – [Voiceover] In
Vancouver, I’m Grant Hardy for Accessible Media.

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