Jak namalować obraz – zima

Jak namalować obraz – zima


You’ll need the following materials to paint winter, for more details on the equipment skip to the end of the video to table of contents, after the final credits. Hello everyone! Today we’ll be painting a winter landscape. Beautiful winter, quite similar to the one from “Skansen”. Where we can see some houses, made out of wooden beams, snow-covered roofs and chimneys and essentially wonderful, polish trees. Perhaps a few fences and some birds here and there. Where do we start today? We surely need some white color. Let’s squeeze out quite a lot of the white. Except that, to create the sky we need some basic blue colors. Ultramarine and a bit of the black color. We can also add some flesh acrylic paint to even out the colors. Let’s set the horizontal line of our landscape with a nylon brush, a flat one. We dip it into water and now we can take some of the black color and a bit of ultramarine. And I want our horizontal line to be somewhere here. As you can see the sky will take quite some space. So now let’s start with the farthest element. Meaning the 3rd plan. We’ll need a big and wide brush to make our background. It can be wide and flat like this one. The bigger the better. It’s important that it’s nylon and quite flexible. It has to be flexible during the work on our canvas, So that the paint can be absorbed well. Especially during painting the first layer, so we gently dip our brush now. To our white color let’s add a little bit of- (not too much, because we don’t want our sky to be too dark) Look, a little bit of light blue, ultramarine, to even out the color a tiny bit of black. We can’t make the sky too blue or it will look unnatural. Keep in mind that the sky during winter is a bit more greyish. Which means, a bit of flesh acrylic paint won’t harm us. Okay I like this color Look at it So, let’s start painting! For now we press in the paint with more water, so that it can sink in the canvas. Try to do it swiftly, so that the paint doesn’t dry out. I’m using this very color all the time, because especially at the beginning our canvas needs a lot of paint and water. If you intend to buy a white color, I suggest to pick a really big tube, like this one. White is the most used color, so when buying a set of colors, I guarantee that you will run out of white the soonest. Okay, our background is pretty evenly painted, so we can detail it now. We’ll start with the underlayer of the clouds now, but with a slightly darker tone. We are using the very same colors all this time. Look, using the ultramarine, a little bit more of the light blue this time, some black color to even it out. So the color doesn’t come out too disturbing. A tiny bit of flesh acrylic paint. Basically it’s the very same color as before, but without so much white now. Let this color be a bit darker. And let’s try to work with it in a few spots. Taking advantage of the fact that our background layer is still wet. All the time adding more water. We have to add a bit of light shades, so that the colors can blend well with each other. We have to work seriously fast and quite rough, so it can easily exhaust our hand. Just a few more lighter spots. Now that the first layer is evenly covered in paint, we can start adding less water, so our paint gets a bit thicker. Okay, now look We’ve already made the underlayer, so now we just have to make our clouds on it. We have a few techniques for cloud painting, one of them is using a sponge. Take a look We’ll need a sponge Look, it’s a really simple sponge, took from the kitchen and now, what to do with this sponge? We dip it lightly in the water, next we squeeze out the excess water, so that it’s just slightly wet and after that we will work with white and its shades. Because clouds despite their appearance, have many different shadows. We dip our sponge in the paint like so. It can’t be too wet, because we’ll get an unnecessary stain as a result. And we want to tap that sponge onto our canvas quite the bit, so that our clouds are fluffy. So how do we create our clouds? Let’s see I simply tap our sponge gently… leaving us with soft clouds. This way the clouds come out very natural. I’m slightly rotating the sponge to make our clouds more spherical. If we tap a square sponge onto the canvas without any rotation, we’ll get rectangle shaped stamps and we don’t want that to happen. And the best way to avoid it, is to grab our sponge like that and rotate it around while tapping. Obviously in spots where we add more paint the clouds will be more intense. So I suggest you start from the top, this way the bottom of our clouds will be nicely blended and the transition will appear natural. Then we’ll be able to truly achieve a natural effect of everything we’re doing so far We can also gently rub the sponge to press the paint onto our canvas. It’s a really simple and efficient way to paint our clouds. To achieve it we need evenly painted sky with lots of color transitions. Try to avoid small, single clouds. By painting them, we risk having a cartoon-like landscape. Okay now let’s add some more warmth to our sky. We’ll add a little bit of flesh tone to the white and we’ll warm up our sky around the horizon. Rubbing the paint in, we’ll bring out some warmth with round motions. Our painting is a bit warmer now and I think that the clouds appear pretty natural. Let’s move onto the other elements of our painting. Now we’ll have to sketch out the most important things, that will appear on the second and the first plan. Now we’ll need again a flat, medium-sized nylon brush, a little bit of light blue. For now our palette is monocoloristic. Once we start adding some architecture, we’ll surely add some brown colors. Let there be a road more or less in here. A road that will begin quite far away, from the second plan and due to perspective it will widen the closer it gets. Something like that. So that our composition isn’t too boring we shouldn’t make the road centered, in the triangle shape. It would look rather unappealing. Ok, if our road starts about here There will also be a line of some trees on the third plan giving us the idea, that it might be a forest. Maybe even a few bushes somewhere to nicely indicate the distance. Keep in mind that everything on the third plan has to be in a really close shade as the sky. We call that an “aerial perspective”, in which the further away something is, the more it appears to be foggy and it obtains a similar to the sky tone. In our case, when the sky is about here, pretty chilled with shades of blue, with a little bit of flesh tone, if we add some darker shade of the same colors we will show the distance of the third plan very well. Let’s smoothen out the area of our trees and the forest, in the distance. Using the same color palette all the time, but quite darker this time. Right now we are going to create an underlayer for our third plan along the horizontal line. We’re trying to paint an irregular shape to indicate different height of the trees. For now it looks like some mountains, but we will work on that soon. Let’s add more water to avoid leaving an empty, white spots on our canvas. Later on they will appear unpleasant and they always give the idea of an unfinished painting, so our only way to avoid it is adding more water. We can use various shades from our color palette, lighter on the top and darker on the bottom, but keep in mind that it’s only the underlayer for now. What now? Now we will do something really simple and pleasant. Even kids love it! We have to take a spatula and we will make use of the fact, that this layer is still wet and underneath it, there’s a lighter and dry one and we will scratch out trunks of trees which are really far away, so it can look like tiny light threads. We have to make them look natural meaning it can’t be regular. Otherwise it can look like a fence. We want some tiny, light lines, far away which will indicate that this is some kind of a forest. And not, for the example, bushes. Now we’re doing the same thing for the entire tree line. On the left side the forest seems to be closer to us, because the trees appear to be bigger. Having a totally flat canvas it’s us that give the optical illusion of space, mostly with the size and colors. Keeping in mind every rule of the perspective. Including linear, aerial and color perspectives. Okay, the tree trunks themselves are not enough, because we would have some sort of a destroyed forest here meaning the forest after it burnt down. During winter a lot of trees, for the example coniferous trees, remain the same as they were, expect for the snow layer. So now we will tap-paint the trees. We will need a bristle paintbrush. The bristle brushes come in many different sizes, they can be wider or smaller. But what is really important? Our bristle brush should be only slightly wet, not extremely wet. So I suggest gently rubbit it against a rag. Now we bend our brush sideways, using our fingers to make the brush less tighten. Because the paint which will be on the very ends of our brush will be put on our painting at a 90-degree angle leaving us with lots of tiny spots. Using the very same colors, from our palette again. This time let’s make it a little bit lighter, by applying some more white, we’re going to add some flesh as well, but we also need to use some blue colors, so that the color contrast doesn’t appear too large. Let’s try it out! Look at it! Gently tapping… slowly we get the appearance of our trees. It’s another easy, very simple and really impressive technique. Due to the fact, we have painted a darker underlayer for our trees earlier, it appears as if there is much more of them deeper in the forest. So it’s not only a few of them, but… an entire forest. They shouldn’t be all the same, so we can try and make them different. Some can be slightly darker, some can be a bit lighter, but the most important part, is that the light falls down on the trees, naturally from up above, meaning that the lightest parts are going to be the crowns of the trees. We’re starting from white, mixed with some flesh tone Our sky was purposely lit up with some flesh, so that this soft, warm winter color could also appear on our trees. It will look very realistic. Let’s add a tiny bit of ultramarine. It can be this shade. A tiny bit of light blue. Let’s mix it with previous colors and let’s continue! Let’s try using the same technique with a smaller brush and we’ll see if there’s any difference. Take a look, spots made with the smaller brush despite everything are more intense. Why is it? Despite believing, that the smaller brush we use, the more precise it’ll be. In case of bristle paint brushes – it’s totally opposite! That’s why I want you to keep that in mind. If you wish to achieve some seriously tiny spots, I suggest grabbing a bigger and wider brush, which has more possibility to make our tiny spots! Right here, we’ll leave some empty space, because that’s where the path is leading. Which means, that the path might be going through the forest, so we’re going to make a tiny clearance there. We’ll need a sponge, which will lighten up this spot and give it a tiny mist. Let this road end somewhere far, far away… so we’ll lighten up our winter forest. We’ll make an impression, that the sky and the fog are coming through the beautiful forest. We are going to quickly make an underlayer, basically for our entire first plan. Due to the fact, that snow is covering our ground, we have a typical winter scenery, we’ll make our first underlayer using similar shades and a sponge. I’m lightly dipping our sponge in water, because I would like the paint to sink in the canvas well. And just like with a paint brush, but this time with a sponge, I’ll smear our first layer on the canvas. I would also like to get an impression, that there’s a tiny bit of a fog in the distance. So by gently tapping around, I’ll create a fog surrounding my forest on the third plan. That way, we’ll be able to blur out a sharp line, which definitely shouldn’t make an appearance so far away. Tiny, light spots that will remain on the canvas after tapping around, can as well imitate some bushes in the distance, which can absolutely grow nearby a forest. With round, gently motions I’m creating a natural fog. As tapping a little bit harder, I’m using up the remaining paint inside of my sponge. As you can see, a sponge can become a wonderful painting tool! Generally speaking, we can even make an entire painting with it! Right now, I’m adding a bit of a darker shade. On the first plan we definitely need some strong contrast. We are also following the rule, that the closer something is, the more detailed it appears and we see the colors as more vibrant. As well as the contrasts, that we are going to talk about soon. I added a tiny bit of the black to suppress the blue color. Adding a little bit more water… The road is entirely covered in snow, but if there are houses alongside the road, surely some means of transport have been moving on it. Maybe some sleighs, maybe some cars… Due to the fact, we surely will have some deeper potholes, which we’re going to make in a darker shade. Showing that something have driven across it. Maybe sleigh ride? I’ll add some black paint and a bit of our blues, still using the very same colors. Ok, let’s create some shadow. Let’s work with a paint brush! It can be a middle-sized, nylon brush. We’ll spread some lighter tones now, to soften our dark, sponge spots. Ok, something pleasing is happening in here. What’s next? It’s finally the time to start shaping our buildings, as well as trees appearing on the 2nd and 1st plan. Let’s sketch out our contours and shapes of what we’re going to paint next. This time, we’re going to need a flat, nylon brush, can be about this size. Now we’re going to work on some more details, so we can sit comfortably. Aside from the colors we’ve been using up until now, it would be good to add some brown, dark brown like amber. This color looks like that. A shade of brown, with a soft tone of green. I’ll add a lighter shade of brown to that. Take a look. A little bit of light sienna or ochre color. They are two pretty similar colors, one of them lighter, the other one darker. No matter which one we choose, we’re going to mix it with some brown, surely adding some white and black. For now using a dark color and middle-sized, flat, nylon paint brush we’re going to outline some more detailed elements of our painting. Obviously adding water all the time. In this spot I’m placing our first village house. Let’s paint its shape. Remember that these lines have to be parallel. Otherwise the house will appear as if it’s about to collapse. Right here we will have a small extension, typical for such a house. Maybe some wood… and a chimney. And right behind our house, let’s make another one. To be more specific, a part of it. We’ll paint some trees as well, which should be more or less this height, so that they are proportional to the buildings. In the front, on the first plan, we will paint much larger and taller trees, which are going to contrast everything quite the bit. During winter, pretty leaf-less. Here on the side, let’s have some branches poking out, probably from some other trees. And on the other side we need some more buildings, since it’s common for a village. Here I’m painting a tree, it’ll be much lower, so closer to us. And right over here we can have an old-looking fence. Ok, we have planned out everything we’re going to paint. Let’s start with the houses. Before we start painting the roofs, I suggest starting with the walls. Brown, made out of beams, walls. Don’t mind the windows or doors for now, we’re going to paint them a bit later on. Let’s have the light shine from this side. So let’s light up this wall. All the walls on the left side are going to be lighter. If we make the walls on the right side darker, we’ll keep a nice light perspective. Underneath the roof it’s always darker, because the roof stick out a lot and it casts a shadow at the wall. Here I’m also making a dark spot, and on this side a bit lighter. Let’s make the other house as well. Keeping in mind that it’s just an underlayer and we’ll finish our houses with a spatula. They will look quite interesting and pretty artistic. Okay Let’s take our spatula now. I’m wiping it with a cloth, so it’s clean and so no water drips from it. I’m taking my paints, see how my color pallet looks right now Let’s begin. On the underlayer we’ve made, we’ll now try and add some structure. For the examples, typical for village houses, wooden beams. Lighting it up a little bit. Take a look, every single beam is finished with a nice light touch up. I’m making them due to the fact that the beams are overlaid from each side. And the same thing here, but with a darker shade. Let’s add more paint and just then sculpt out the structure of our beams. Remembering it’s always darker at the top, because the roof casts a shadow. Thanks to that the house will look realistic. Here again, a little bit lighter. And on this side darker. Now let’s add some windows and doors. One more window here will look appealing. Our finishing touch is going to be a snow-covered rooftop. Let’s work with some greyish blue, which are going to be our shadow at first, then we’ll add some intensive white tone. Remember that white has many shades. To show an intensive, pure white color, we have to make a few underlayers first. With some blue, ultramarine, grey, sometimes with a bit of black or other colors. I’m adding a bit flesh color, which I’ve used previously on the sky and on the trees in the background. That’s why our warm flesh can be mixed with the snow. Let’s take a slightly bigger spatula. Can be a little bit rounded. Now let’s try to add some more clean white with a bigger surface. We’re working, until we’re satisfied with the effects. I wanted to create something like that. A bit more snow on the other side. And a bit of snow here, on the edge, but not on the entire surface, because there’s a lot of shadow on that small roof. Let our rooftop stick out a little bit more. Now we’re going to make a chimney. A chimney from which a smoke rises. In the village, it’s a way of knowing if someone’s present in the house. The chimney is also slightly covered in snow. Let’s work on the other house. We’re doing the exactly same things as before. A little bit faster. We don’t see much detail in this house. The house in the back is much less detailed, compared to the one in the front. I think we have enough of snow covering our roofs. Let’s try to focus on this side. What do we have in here? More trees. These trees appear on the second plan, not the third plan. Not the closest to us, but we can see many more details, compared to the forest in the distance. So what are we going to do? With a small, precise brush, we’ll try to paint the tree trunks. A little bit more detailed. We need a lot of water, so that the lines are thin. To stabilize our hand in front of the canvas, so that we can make precised touch ups, we have a method for that. We press our pinky finger, if it won’t mess up our painting or if it’s not on a wet surface. We press it to the canvas, for the support of our entire hand. This way it’s so much easier to work on a detailed painting. Let’s make some thinner, more detailed branches. Now let’s add some lighter tones, using white, because it’s winter time. I’m painting the trees on the second plan. We’ll need bristle paintbrush. We dip it lightly in the water. Can be something like this one. First using browns and a bit of blue lightly. It’s this dark color. Chilled a little bit. Let’s start tapping gently with our dark color. Here and there, we have the leftovers of the leaves. We can add a little bit of a warm-toned ochre color. And now lightly covering our trees in snow. Adding white. A tiny bit of flesh color. Ok, done! Let’s add some shadows here, so that our trees and houses seem more in depth. We’ll be using a flat, nylon brush for that. With many different shades of blue and maybe some black to even it out let’s try to add some shadows in here. Both, shadows of the trees and the houses. Using a lot of water, we can paint a glaze layer (thin, almost see through layer). This color can also be added to our buildings. Let’s take a look how well these colors work together and blend. And in a natural way they reflect the light, because our snow just like the water, will reflect the light and different color tones. We’ll add some brighter light later on. Ok, let’s work on that tree on the first plan. For the beginning, I’d recommend amber with a tiny bit of black as our underlayer. Ok, let’s add some different shades. A bit of ochre, blending it slightly and on the right side I’m darkening our tree, just like everything else. For a better effect, let’s use our spatula. A small one, can be the tiniest, which we have used previously to work on our houses. Using the amber color and black. I’ll swipe through our tree with more paint, to show the tree bark structure. Ok, with the edge of our spatula we’ll make a few tiny branches, by dipping spatula in the water. And it’s time to cover our tree in snow. Obviously adding more white paint. Cleaning our spatula from the previous, dark colors. Now we’ll try to lighten up the tree. Cleaning our spatula again, it has to be perfectly clean. We’ll have more snow at the bottom. On the upper half, the branches cover the tree, so we can paint less snow in this area. Obviously the lower part will be covered in snow heavily. We can even add a tiny bit of blue. And we’ll add some snow on the bigger branches. Right here the tree could be broken, so let’s create a hole inside of it. The snow can appear in here. Ok, now a bit of tapping, just as on the previous tree. Taking a bristle brush now. This way we are gently adding snow to the branches or perhaps the leftover leaves. Ok, we’re left with a part of a tree, which only sticks out on the painting. It indicates that the composition is opened and not closed, that perhaps further on there are more houses, more things. As it usually is on the landscape. Let’s line out these branches more visibly. I’ll prepare a flat, nylon brush as usual. Adding more water. Using the brown and black palette. Ok, let’s use a small spatula again. Repeating everything as on the previous tree. Covering this area in snow. Ok, now adding some clear white. And tapping with the brush a little bit. Ok, now we’re adding more shadows. Using lots of water, we’ll make a glaze layer. Let’s take a moment to work on the road. Here we have a tree, so surely we’ll have a shadow right here as well. Ultramarine, black and white. Adding some more white. Ok, now we will be working with the other side of our painting. Using the very same method, we’ll be painting houses on the left side. Now we can work with a spatula. This time, this side is darker. That’s why we need this dark shade, mixed with blue, instead of a clear white. Let’s wait for them to dry, then we’ll be able to add some more shadows and details, using more water. Now let’s work on the shadows and the tree on the second plan. Let’s paint a few more trees behind this house, so that this side of our landscape isn’t so empty. Now slightly tapping. I’ll lighten up this spot. Next I’ll paint the tree. This tree will partly cover our house. And it will end about here, because it shouldn’t be too tall, compared to the house’s proportions. We’ll need more black. Lots of water and liquidy paint will allow us to paint some really thin lines. Tiny bit of blue, that our tree bark should be reflecting. And some white. We’ll try to lightly add snow on our branches now. Now we’ll move onto the tapping. With various shades of blue and white, we’ll be tapping the paint onto our canvas. Let’s paint a fence on this side. Right behind the tree, alongside our houses. A little bit bent here and there, very natural, typical, old village fence. The closer, the bigger the planks. Ok, let’s add some touch ups with a spatula. We’ll make some shadows coming from the fence. Let’s make a tree shadow with a glaze layer. We can also try a different method, using a thin, flat nylon brush. Dipping it slightly in water. And we’ll try to make an intriguing effect here. Grass covered in hoarfrost. Our houses have dried out. We can add a bit of glaze layer. Ok, we’re missing a bit of the white snow, so we’ll add it using a sponge. Ok, at the end we’ll use spatula some more. We can use a bigger one, size 4 this time. We’ll add white on a clear palette, because we will work mostly with white now. Let’s add brighter snow. Let’s add some smoke, coming from the chimney, then it’ll give us the idea, that someone is inside. Let’s sign our painting and see it framed. That’s how our ‘Winter’ looks like, framed. The frame also warms it up. I hope that everyone will try to face this beautiful season, winter. “Paints used for making this painting” “Liner paint brushes” “Kitchen sponge” “Flat nylon paint brushes, various sizes” “Bristle paint brushes” “Spatulas”

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