Make this End Table – Watch Ken Use “Real” Woodworking Joinery (Mortise and Tenon)

Make this End Table – Watch Ken Use “Real” Woodworking Joinery (Mortise and Tenon)


Can I make a table using “real” woodworking
joinery? I know. It kinda makes me feel dirty somehow. I picked out some poplar to make the legs. The were reasonably flat, so I just smoothed
one side of each with the planer and glued the two together. I squared up one end then I used a sled to
edge joint one side and the sliced it into four inch and one half with legs. I cut each leg to its final length. I used and 1/4 inch straight bit and set up
the fence on the router table to make open mortises. I clamped a stop block at the length
I wanted. For each leg I took several passes to make
the mortise to the depth 1/2 inch. I one of the legs to set the stop block to
the proper distance on the other side of the fence. I cut the other mortises. I cut the two long skirts and two short skirts
to length and rip them to width. After some tests, I cut the mortises by setting
the rip fence the length of my tenons. I start at the fence, and the make passes moving away
from then fence until I come to the end of the board. I flip the board and repeat the
process. The fit was still too tight so I sanded the
tenon until I got the fit I wanted. I determined the amount of tenon that needed
cut off on the bottom. I cut them off with a hand saw and clean it up and rounded the
tenon with a chisel. Now I rough cut the pieces for the top. These
were twisted, so I made a crude sled so I could joint them with the planer. Using the
sled again, I edge jointed the pieces and glued them together. Sanding Yeah. The
legs had their bottoms chamferred and the
edges rounded over. I glued and assembled the long sides. Then I
glued the the short sides to one of the long
sides, and glued the other long side assembly. More sanding on the top now. I square and trim the top to size. Then final sanding on the top and rounding
the edges. Using the drill press, I create holes for
the figure eight connectors on the skirts. Some wood conditioner, stain, and spray lacquer. I fasten the figure eight connectors to the
skirts, lined up the top and
fastened the top. Finally a coat of wax. Wow, real woodworking. I feel so dirty. I’m
going to have to make something with pocket holes make up for it. You can join an exclusive club if you like
my Facebook page or follow me on Twitter. You can find free plans for this table at
my website. See the link in the description. If this is your first time here please subscribe
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who only uses duck tape for joinery.

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