Mr. Eazi Talks African Pride In Home Grown Artists and Sound | SWAY’S UNIVERSE

Mr. Eazi Talks African Pride In Home Grown Artists and Sound | SWAY’S UNIVERSE



the legendary the iconic Freddy Fox give a round of applause yes indeed you know this is one of the things we like to do heavy on this show we've done this a lot even when we first came on this particular channel on Sirius XM 8 years ago it's always try to bring attention to artists who on the rise we start doing our international outreach maybe eight years ago and bringing people here that I thought were interesting or you thought were interesting that was on the rise and foreign places whether it was in France whether there was in Australia whether it was in Scandinavia Japan Japan you know we Canada a lot of Canadian artists and especially now I've been having just I've always had a strong interest in what was going on a continent of Africa you know which has about 54 countries on the continent alone and so imagine that 54 countries in each place in each city in each country probably has his own movement at least in terms of music sound culture and otherwise you know a lot of artists that are doing huge things overseas that people here may not even be familiar with but this particular artists his star is starting to rise in a major way he's a songwriter he's an entrepreneur he's a fashionable guy to me he's a cultural curator and having listened to his mixtapes and watching his videos I really love his videos he gives me a lot of insight on a social circle that he's come from to me that has become global so he's an international global artist I want to welcome him to the shoulder one and only mr. easy [Applause] sup man I'm good how you doing I'm doing well man I had to go back and out you know what I'd do a lot of times I start learning about you I think we're opening clothes and and pour me water yeah and hold up yeah these are songs that you may but I was like do this dope you know it I have to go back to listen to your mix tapes about the blow and like oh you know do it that's like yeah that's like pre-professional your pre-professional but I like the seed of growth you know and there's been a lot of growth even as who you are as an artist and how you write and how you present your music between now and then but before we get into that what's your story man what were you born I was born in Pawtucket is like the south south saved the the oil capital of Lagos of Nigeria so my dad was in the military so he traveled a lot uh-huh and my mom was my mom is a businesswoman till tomorrow you know so like you know so stirring up like I just I feel like studying up like in life I just always go like I was open-minded to Nigeria has multiple tribes like we didn't tribes or tribes the hundreds of tribes within tribes you know one different languages between languages and because I kept traveling because my dad was in the military and changing schools and I I just I became open-minded and that just grew like going on and you know after high school mom wanted me to go to Ghana yeah so do you knew I wanted to come to the US or or Canada but she wants you to go to the University yeah she wanted she wanted me to go to the University in Ghana cuz she didn't want me to be far from home and she wanted me to still stay in touch with like my roots and culture another – so I ended up going to Ghana to study mechanical engineering so whilst I was doing mechanical engineering all my friends were like super rich kids and they just mark like my years pocket money they would spend like in week you know and I wanted to bow like them so I started doing parties and so when I started doing parties me and my manager right now we started like booking the artist from born a boy DeVito r2bees one day Cole like all the heavy hitters then and that just brought me into the music world cuz you know some who you who you hang around is who you become so hanging around artists when they come the one who go to studio I'll be watching them doing that thing in the studio and one day I recorded my own record and I did a show where the artist didn't show up and everybody was looking at me and I just picked up the mic and I started I started seeing these songs that recorded in my room and people go distracted for a while enough for me to run away that was like the first five yeah yeah I pray the book adding PD artist you know so boy like fast forward from that I I didn't want to like practice engineering I tried that but I just knew that was in my life and you know I started you know john d rockefeller and I just go obsessed my dad is a pilot and he's like okay maybe you have your engineering degree maybe you become a pilot and I felt like I could hire pilots why become the pilot you know so he we tricked my mom you know by saying let him go do his MSC so the MSC time the masters time was just more time for me to experiment on businesses so I would do like serial businesses fail fail fail fail have some socks as fail fail fail fail and music was like my getaway music was the only time I wasn't thinking of you know the business and the failures and the successes it was just that cocoon for me and I remember my friend telling me you you you I think it could be a star and he took me to his room Shantanu clue monster and we recorded for week I was in his room and we call it about the blue so that's why I was laughing yeah cuz I the first mixtape and at that point I didn't want to be an artist because I didn't think you know I wanted to be like I want to be a billionaire so I felt like I knew how much I was paying these artists so I was like oh you know my I would say how many artists can I point that have houses that have their own houses they have that comfortable that could pay for school fees for their kids like the level of schools I went to and I couldn't like really see that so I never wanted you know on that I was just gonna stay hobby until you know I moved back to Nigeria I start another business and some way in between I started practicing what I was learning in my VC business like digital markets you know that I'll just play with it on the music side and one day some kid in New York shoutout to moyes ma he hit me up on Twitter and he's like you I wanted verse and I'm like okay and he says he'll pay me $1,000 for it I'm like wow so I add II diverse sent it to him and then monster coming December of twenty some time in July my friends put together money for my birthday gift and then they shot a video for me in December they did the same thing again like we all put money together we shot skin tight skin tight and then I would do digital marketing and just like like from my laptop just do digital marketing send it to the world and it just blew up March of 2016 I'll go for my first UK tour I was so shocked like I thought it was this come when they booked me because they're like ain't don't nobody knows me like I'm not doing shows in Nigeria Ghana I go out there do five shoes sold out shoes I go back to my business I tell my investor I'm like I need a loan of ten thousand pounds I wanted like try round with music and he was just laughing he just gave it to me I went back to the UK July 2016 I did to fit I did a festival gagana party in the park I sold out and then I did my own show I booked the venue by myself did all the marketing and sold out two shows in five days and that was July 20 second I just called my mama like mama now a musician like ya full-time and she's like are you sure how can now you're a musician before you an engineer then you say you're businessman now you're a musician I just I just do that how much I'd made how much did you make that time um he knows in between those two shoes I probably made like Teddy two grand – it you know and when I told her how much like when you convert it to narrow dance today are you serious and I sent her the videos I shoulda seen all these people singing if you give your heart to me and she's like okay well I think you know what you're doing and I put all that money back into the music to show like more videos like I put everything I left London with 20 pounds uh-huh you know and he's just blown up from there she's been getting you know bigger and bigger business oh you've been invested in yourself your best natural resource you at some point hooked up with Diplo because a lot of people thought you gonna sign to his late yeah how did that happen our Twitter no first my fan saw deep blue dancing – I think it was leg over on snapchat and then they just tried to hit me up and then I Twitter him and I'm like oh thank you for you know jamming to my record and he D and me he's like yo I'm really feeling this it was and he's like were you and at the time it was 2017 I was having my first proper tour in the u.s. I was doing a college tour for three months I was touring colleges for afro-caribbean student was lovely you booked the tour yeah we booked it and I just boot I'm a manager I was just booked it by we went to the backend of our like Spotify our YouTube and we saw the cities where we were getting the most pleas from and we just created a fake flier saying not American tour contacts blah blah but book and all these University students type book and once we got one we would then say what going to another one that were not going like we'll go into a university in this city guess was it is it that's what unit is and then they were booked and before you know it we had like a food tour I even played the PlayStation theater uh-huh I'm Brooklyn I'm sorry Times Square try man right here yes I went to Le what we didn't walk we just chilled me and deep blue we caught a vibe like I just saw he was really genuine and I was a fan from what what Javed is like that influenced me lost boom i yeah boom I so meeting him I'm just catching a vibe with him we didn't make any music two weeks later he flies me back down we make 12 record time with like okay you know what this let's just work and we've been working since there you know what I detect from you and even based on the conversation that we were talking about outside and outside the studio is a very global minded yeah to your point you said you were always open minded to because of all the different tribes that were in the Nigeria beginning with that Diplo who's a friend of the show he's a friend of the station a friend of the channel yes his own channel here yeah and I've known him for years sometimes he gets back laughs I've been a cultural appropriator or some people just say culture vulture yeah did that concern you initially and what are your thoughts on that you know I like even from when like some of my friends and colleagues like saw me like close colleagues saw me like back and forth on Twitter with him they're like yo easy are you sure like you wanna you wanna be careful you know but for me I'm I'm always open-minded I always like to meet somebody before I and when I met him I didn't feel I didn't feel that energy at all I felt a genuine energy of someone who was very inquisitive musically and he wasn't trying to see oh I invented dancehall or I pushed us all to the next level or I discovered afrobeat no he he was genuinely saying yo I don't even know what's going on here but I love this sound who made it like what are your thoughts what music are you feeling from around the world what would you try to get on it was that kind of conversation it was like I was having a conversation with someone that was like me cuz like I like that like I went to London I listened to the vibes I made Lee goes London wasn't a subsidy and I'm a product like I listen to listen to dancehall and you hear a bit of dance so I listen to reggae music and I hooked up with chronics for my last one so if I would if I if I can get influenced by things around me which the world right now is is one place so everything is around us from everywhere and you never know subconsciously sips in it comes into you and you your product of what what comes in mixed up with yourself and if that's what everybody is doing in one way or the other then everybody can be accused of the same thing the same thing although there are boundaries the boundaries and gotta be respectful you gotta you know acknowledge the source of your inspiration as long as you do that I'm cool you cool with that mister easy as here we're gonna we're gonna play some music in a moment but one of the things I appreciate about him is about you is when I look at your videos you know I'm I'm getting an insight you know in your peer group in your social circles based out of Africa that I don't see this kind of representation I see young affluent African people who are ambitious who are extremely beautiful the women in your videos are probably the most beautiful and different complexions that we don't normally see yeah even here in the States in these music videos yeah what's the concept behind all this what is the to trying to let the world in on you know for me I like to represent like my reality like I like to show you my reality and do like the first time I came to America and all I saw on TV when it was Africa like when I put on the TV the facade I saw was aid give to no suffering kids and like I was saying the other day I was surprised the first time I came to America and I saw people sleeping on the streets cause like that was in that was in the America that I had seen and so I was like so people are sleeping on the streets in America and this cold so the the same thing that exists the same parallels worldwide like you know in every in in in everywhere and so for me it's like I've got to be real to myself and I've got to show the world my world and the realities does does a young Africa has like the population is very young very young population and the Internet has bridged has breached the world now everybody has access to information to everything and there's the strong middle class or port that is global in their mindset in the in the thinking in the interest in in in education you have loads of kids out here come to the West for the BSC and then go back to Nigeria come for their masters and then go back to Nigeria or Ghana Kenya and that's the word I tried to represent and in my videos like when we're picking like the girl the models to be in the video I always say you know what I don't just sing to the darker skinned girls or the lighter skinned girls or the Asian girls or the African goes or the Jamaican girls I sing to everybody and so I try to represent that as much as possible because that's that's my reality you know you can only give what what is real I'm where my fancy they can see themselves in my video when they see me just rocking it see and the jeans like they feel like yes my boy easy I can lead to that you know that's why there's never been a Jets my video because that's not my that's not my present reality but it looked like you hang out with a lot of affluent rich young African who are dressed Heather you got to see the way they dress like that fashion forward in a way that I have is I feel learn to dress when I watch the videos the dress code but I think that's needed to be seen even when I was in South Africa hanging out with my man see sway who ya you know from MTV Base who used to watch me on your TV is open see like just recently and I was blown away I'm like are you sure these guys yeah and he confirmed it when we met when we met I said because we used to watch MTV base and most of the content was filmed out of South Africa so I was just I am a Frenchie so to matically thought he was South African so I remember the first time I watched like a freestyle your show I was like wow this South African guy has now moved to South Africa but the reality is like there's a very strong population of very successful African like first generation kids and the success is not just like a music or in the fashion or in aviation or in sports like it's across borders in medicine it's like everywhere and this this generation is very proud of where they're from and the culture that's you're not like nobody is back in the day like maybe you'll be shy to play your Nigerian music so loud but now were unapologetic like we're going to a club and paid DJ and see you I don't want to hear no hip up I just want to hear 100% nightjar music 100% Ghana music 100% care music that's and that's what's helping that's what that's what's helping the entire ecosystem from the movies to like the culture in general the cultural exports which is which is where we are right now and I think is really important that people see that you know it would even encourage people to like go back I'm like I'm a very big believer of you know us you know us black people are going back going back to Africa I'm Lola I like doing doing things cuz there's so much opportunity so much opportunity you know so if I can do that via my music videos or my Instagram pictures or my lifestyle you know why not why not mr. easy is here we're gonna play the single arm let's play our supernova it's out right now and then we're gonna open up the phone lines you want to talk with I'm eight eight eight seven four all right give us a call sway the morning say four five now man this is a very this is an artist if you don't know you should get to know his story is an amazing one and it's interesting to me that he could be from a forum so called for him from across so I'm not even gonna say for in place but from overseas and come into the States and out work people who are from the States creating his own concert tours creating his own awareness creating this all this energy right yeah we were having a beautiful conversation why his song was playing and just talking about judgment a little bit you know because I was asking him just the same way people would assume you were from South Africa and I said if I went there where people think that I was from a particular place and he said they can tell where you're from based on maybe how you stand on how you dress or how you speak and it's so crazy you know to have that because here we don't really have that identification from anywhere just by the way I speak people think I'm from Brooklyn and I'm I'm not I'm from Jersey you know it's just that I have a heavy accent but it's so amazing that you're able to identify or people can judge based on where you know how you dress and how you stand there's such a crazy thing so I would go over there lost way David did they know I was far she said for any of this you were African yeah you know and we had burned a boy on the show and you bring up on top Hedo and how you work with these guys before the critical acclaim before the global fame what were they like then you know it was I feel that he's all like for instance bonny boy I've before I started making music I was a fun so like I would only book people I'll be bias our book people that I'm feeling and force them I'm promoting make sure you come to the concert because I see this is what so you know and I'd say he's kept the same energy same energy from the first time I met him chill so now you know when the same thing for Ford a video has been the same energy from when I first met him in Kumasi till till now so is consistent like bigger black put of them is it's always been and then I was no I was just a promoter who booked them so they didn't need to show me any like respect like I'm just paying them they just came to work it's always been the same wanton you know are they happy for you as an artist what have they said like wow look at what you did yeah like born like every time one who sees me he's always laughing because like he's seen he's like he's seen everything like from then I'm him I'm a manager they used to be very close because I think my manager used to bring a lot of business like outside of our business in Kumasi so him seeing him now managing me and like what going on concerts together going on records together beautiful yeah yeah he's like he's like yeah for me I just I tried to run away because like she's like even the people that the people around me they say now I'm learning they're like oh yeah and then I always now I'm dissing them I like you guys are no fashion for because I try some stuff and he works you just you just flows and everybody's like oh this is actually dope boy I think I'm learning from from everybody else but you that sponge man mr. easy you see I'm gonna talk about this new platform you about there that you started but first we got Hussain on a lion from Kenya who's in Dallas what up who's saying are you doing kinda miss that bro I'm good huh it's alright I really dig that talk about you know being proud of where you from you know I said I feel the pressure sometimes like like with my accent and stuff yeah trying mask it you know so people don't ask where you're from and stuff well that's what's up man are you do you have his music yet Oh mr. yeah yeah definitely man I miss I miss your concert though when you came to Dallas in April though yeah yeah yeah I think I pushed I pushed Dallas I'm gonna come back like later under yeah so hey who's saying you were citizen man from Africa try to do that mystery like hide their accent and you seem like it's something that you would be proud of that you would want people to notice you know where you from Sabina I think it's changing okay it's like back in the day when I was in in high school like when I was in primary school it was uncool to like speak your local language like it wasn't uncool so even even like me I'm not as fluent and as I'm supposed to be in my local dialect cuz like when you go to school it's like oh you gotta speak English you know boy from from den up until now that's been like every like even like back in the day when I was in high school you would only listen to like g-unit like Mike Jones Beyonce Sean Paul like fabulous that was like the cool music and that just represented what we what we interpreted as cool so we we taught like foreign was cool at that time and it that would be why we would like try to change our accent like I would have friends who just never left never left the country but just off watching you know movies who try and start speaking with like an American accent we use a California that's what we call it phony like oh you're speaking funny you can speak funny I was good the girls were like you cuz like you speak for they're like wow Thank You Saints point was that because we used to make fun of people and sounded African like gods must be crazy was like you know what I mean like you just would make jokes about people if they sounded like them and it was the same it was almost the same thing back like we would we would laugh at somebody cuz he's in he's accent when he's speaking English is not as as sweet as it's supposed to be but like from high school everything just started to change and I would like to think even music did a good job like when there's an artist coati bunch when when the band came in he brought the swag on the next level that we had never seen and we suddenly all of a sudden from the bunch a rat so now now if you go to Lagos you'd hear maybe 99% Nigerian music and when you put on like the whole of Africa is watching Africa watch is more Africa movies majorly out of Nigeria than anything you know like you have African movies in the cinemas and outselling the movies being American made here and that just shows how things have changed how do you think that since you do business both here in America and then also in Africa and you're influenced by all types of music how could this country improve versus whether it's community whether it's fashion whether it's music where do you see our areas of improvement you know that's that's you know I you know like before I say things I like to be like well like well versed like this this year's the first time like I've been to be honest I've been open to like American like culture and like when I came all those times it was just like I just want to come tour and get out you know but this year was the first time like I was like open I was going out you know trying to experience it so you know I just want one thing I just one thing I just see the difference in you know the major difference is D like the general energy back home in Africa and it's everywhere almost every country you go to in Africa is the the general positivity like I mean I mean people sometimes and I'm like you what I don't understand why you have an attitude like well I can't judge I'm trying to understand why you have like I can feel a negative from you and I guess that's because of what you're going through your history and there's nothing really you could do to change your history because it is there it's just a question of how do you move forward and I don't know how you move forward you know so there's not much like I can speak about you know I just say like out I'm sure I'm sure maybe the places I've gone to it's not everybody that has about what you said it's a it is and I like how you did that you said in Africa wherever you at where you go as a general positive energy yeah and that's the difference yeah you don't always feel that everywhere you go this on the wall or in the world in general yeah Mike me was you got a question yeah I was curious man one from one fellow engineer to other fellow engineer I'm curious about the culture in Nigeria when it comes to art entertainment versus actual academic and engineering because a lot of Americans don't really realizes the richness of Nigeria when it comes to education right like Nigeria send one of the most highly educated and highly advanced immigrants are applying for visas here actually in the United United States I know your parents were very supportive of that but how is that culturally inside Nigeria for those who are opting the arts versus those continuing the great tradition of higher learning in Nigeria I'd see in the past like maybe in the past five years it's changed like back in the day you couldn't even like walk up to your dad and say I want to be a musician I want to be a makeup artist or I want to do art like I remember my grandpa talking and saying can you imagine this this girl studying sociology what kind of study medicine or engineering no mathematics like you know that was that was the that would that was the feeling and that was wait was that and that was also cause the industry at the time like I said earlier I couldn't see there were no role models I couldn't see a lot of successful people from the arts so it was generally frowned upon it was like the arts was for people who couldn't succeed in any other thing in their life and then they go to the arts and but now you have like like myself I have a master's degree and I'm I'm an artist I'm a singer that's all I do like this is what I do and you have more successful people even without like going through the normal school doing very beautiful things within the arts be it music fashion and so everything is changing like now it's it's more open like you could if my sister my even me when I wanted to do music like I was doing music on the low that's why I like most of my first like artworks where cartoons you wouldn't so that people wouldn't recognize me when they see me because I didn't want them to take me less seriously in business cause they say oh this guy's a singer you know but now is it's changed like yeah stop man mr eazi and say give out your social real quick but people want to hit you are my socials everywhere is the odds mr e is the i am are you doing this this distribution network called empower yeah and it spell EMP AWA africa yeah right and it's there's a network that's set up and i'm just giving a scaling of it but you could give us more depth to it for independent emerging artists who looking to do what they do continue to stay independent right through this through this platform platform we see a lot of that mentality now even in the states we've seen how major labels have really screwed over a lot of artists we had de la Sol here recently was celebrating what the 30th anniversary of their first album that in the first three albums they weren't getting any residuals from and that's a legendary iconic group we've seen what happened with artists like TLC in the past and these are one of some of the best-selling groups of all time what is the scene like in Africa when it comes to the relationship between majors and independent artists and what made you decide to do this platform you know up first off like beef I remember my friend from Toronto shoes my name is Shia and shada Shayan the like around the time I decided to take music as like my career she gave me a book and it was a book it was it like a jay-z biography and then that was like my Bible for getting it the music saying because that even like helped me believe that this could turn to something because you know and it used to be something artists you know look up to like you start you wanna be signed by a big international record label so because of that mentality love people and a lot of people that sign the first like the new wave deals didn't really they didn't feel they had they brought a lot to the table when bargaining so they would just take deals that weren't that he knew weren't good for them this is not why not stupid like we had the best lawyers so the nudist deals weren't good for them but it's like this is the goal and I've come to this point by you know doing things myself and I thought was important to to show the next generation of artists and even let him know that you there's no there's no magic in this like yeah what doing this by ourselves we own we own everything from A to Z my content is my collateral my IP is my collateral I could walk into a bank like right now there's something an idea where you could walk into a bank and get a loan for as low as 2% cuz you're creative you know so it's always been important for me to show that so from the very beginning I've been I've been I've been like always vocal about it and I remember that my first interaction with a label I was around the world in the UK the license a record I was on dance for me it was very big in the UK and I remember when we took that funds first we made sure was it was like a licensing deal so it was like a lease yeah and when we took that vast advance for me was capital for my the following career and what I did was I went I made sure they tagged me on all the emails we got him promoting the record and I just went okay you're the one who did the radio okay I want to hire you you're the one who did the TV I wonder how you're the one who's doing the PR I wanna hire you that's been the mentality so that's like on the bone of why I started in power so empower is like to is to and so there's the empower foundation which is where I hope every I plan every year and I started in November i fund hundred artists so in November I just said on my Instagram I'm like you know what if you think you're a talented artist just put up a video of you rapping or singing whatever hashtag and power 100 and in one month we had over 22,000 entries within the hashtag and then it's just I going crazy we picked 100 100 and then we found it and we give them three thousand dollars each to shoot the first professional music videos and this is because people helped me shoot my first yeah so it's like me giving me giving back and one of the guys even before him power I find that an artist from Ghana called crazy Otto he went on to get Beatty nomination and he's like one of the biggest rappers out of Ghana now so we're like okay let's do this let's organize this so on empower Foundation we have those kids from 13 countries where we found out their music videos we put it on the channel they own everything big is a grant so there's no recoup to get everything but then what we start seeing is that then became like a feeder program because you have all these artists they're putting out the music and there are some that will stand out you know and the ones who stand out we then took ten to South Africa for three weeks I had my good friend deep blue he came he came through we had bunch of producers artists DSP guys from from all around or comma mentored him and then we selected sue and we gave them for the investment so it's like CSR meets VC kind of funding oka equity investment only that I don't I don't own you I just won't get any profit back I play sexy yeah because when I sew from the two the two who we fought did for the investment deals we give them 50 grand each okay licensing deals we give them 10 grand to their pockets so because some some of these kids need money kasha and then we help them administer 40 grand we give we have we help them link them up with producers producers musicians to make good music and then we take 20% we take between five to twenty percent depending on how much we invest but the copies are 20% and just like a management fee and we don't recoup on your life so your life is all yours your sink and the oils we just recoup on the music and because that's the kind of deal I would take and so that's the kind of deal I'm giving other people that's the fair kind of deal that the music business could do even here in the States but you know that granny I need and it's working like there's one other Joe boy from Nigeria he's he has his record now is number four on iTunes charts in in Nigeria oh boy Joba jo e Bo I and he's he's like charting across Africa in like five countries you have jaribg Derby out of Ghana dancehall artist is he already pleaded 15,000 capacity therapy I was when I was on stage when he came on stage I was like who are they screaming for you were like he had more screams than me like I was like okay yeah job done you know and all this these two guys have their own record labels now they assigned to their record labels and we just help them do label services and so it's the same thing I'm right now with the empower were launching a path distribution I'm moving my entire catalog from all the distributors I was using to because if I'm selling something in a shoe usually moving everything to empower what do I wear clothes to a publishing situation where we would do publishing at me because we have a large roster of producers Frances legend repeats who we managed produce the record with J Balvin I'm bad bunny that's doing crazy right now on the Oasis album and then so we would we would administer publishing we would do distribution out there with two label services like marketing service in the record and I'm using myself as like the example and the more I read the more bridges I cross and the more connects I make I open it up to everybody that is on this platform so it's not just for emerging artists I'm getting some of my colleagues really should put something on it too how can people go on in power Africa it's empower Africa calm and that's EMM pwe Africa the comp and it is the same thing on socials and power on Instagram is in power Africa on Twitter is in power Africa you should check out the YouTube channel it's empower Africa and that's where all the new videos form the emerging artists that's where they drop and it's it's grown in six months it's almost on 70 K subscribers you have used videos of five five point two million views 1 million views 2 million from artists who does like the first official record which is like beautiful for for me to watch so ultimately it's gonna be the uber for Africa music we want to think I need an african producer you contact empower oh I need an African artist play live you contact empower I need an African songwriter you contact empower so that this whole wave of this whole new after we've we got to make sure it's it's organized properly for everybody making it to monetize see that's what we didn't do in hip-hop so you guys being very progressive mind and our is scattered amongst a bunch of people who have nothing to do with the culture their own the majority of the you know of the equity and all music so I commend you that's all right ok it's a next generation eazy-e AZ I follow him a mess great happy you want to show life on yeah absolutely I can't wait to go to Nigeria yeah you should you Yoshi come like I've been I've been handing out invites every year do a festival it's called death you'li and it's just what it is just a rave artists just come up perform like two three songs so it's like a DJ set and it's like a playlist you when you hear your songs you jump onstage you perform you get out once it's done and yeah you guys invites for everybody we hand I even handle visas so if you say oh you're coming like who do your visas we'll make sure you get like immigration come pick you up from the plane yeah yeah so you you if you want to come just come trees is happening December end of the year between 9gr ghana senegal and cote d'ivoire you're not gonna want to come back yeah everybody always extends last year nobody wanted to go like I left I went back to London and I was still seeing people I invited still there I'm like what are you still doing is way got a song I got a saw we just jump on stage we could do thanks for coming through

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