Musicians Hall of Fame Backstage: Garth Brooks

Musicians Hall of Fame Backstage: Garth Brooks



welcome to the musicians Hall of Fame backstage I'm Joe chambers this week's guest is the biggest settling single artist of all time he sells out stadiums concerts all over the world breaks every record there is to break in the music industry and one of the best people I've ever met in my life Garth Brooks when we come back Garr thanks for coming that's an honor I really uh I don't know what I did to deserve getting the number one selling artists of all time on the a show that had been on the air yet as of this taping but I can't thank you enough as always you always come through so it took two hours to sell just seventy-nine thousand tickets are you worried that's unbelievable I mean two hours and that's a record break everybody's been everybody's been very sweet to us I'm here today simply to say thank you for you you have shined the light on the true Hall of Famers in this town there's not an artist that's in the Hall of Fame across town that's alive that won't sit here and tell you the real stars of the music industry are these men and women that play these unbelievable tracks are these songs that people will have children to get married to have as their first date or their anniversary songs these are the true superstars and it's an honor to be here thank you for making sure they they get the light they deserve say that's that's why Garth is Garth that's that's why everybody loves you because that's what you you always put other people first well they're there the reason we stand here you know sitting here thinking about this stage and thank you again for something else that's the last time I saw my chapman was right here on the stage last time I hugged his neck and it's the last time I ever will in my lifetime I see him every day when I close my eyes but so thank you again for that was a special day now again that was your idea too for those who don't know Mike was the bass player with what is known as the g-man the Garth man I guess played on every record you've ever made yeah Alan Reynolds and I talked about it and Howard said you know I'm not too I'm not sure about this using the same players on every record I said listen this is why I would request it is because once you get to know these guys you can embarrass yourself around them try and then I think what Alan what's but what me and years job is is to make sure they reinvent themselves every record push them push them and the guy that probably reinvented himself the most I would think would have to be Ravi Jake is a fiddle player and probably loose injure the guitar player he just he always stayed current but he always stayed solid and with that foundation or kind of a rock kind of get to are that he plays out of Memphis and Ernest uh I think that's the definitive Garth Brooks sound well you got a you had a road band which is now with you yes on that and now you're doing this since we're on the on the musicians already the you have there's there is two different kinds of musicians there's there's a studio musician and then there's a road musician great a lot of people you know think of a studio musician is one that you know it's the one that comes up with your original riffs that we remember right and then the road musicians our job is to recreate it but they actually have to do more than just recreate it because they have to knowing when not to play is as important as knowing when to play and for a session player but when you're you have to fill a stadium you it's a whole different ballgame right yeah but space is always the most valuable player always and I think that's probably where if music ever misses it's because of the producer of the artist of the player misses that point right there so Alan Reynolds king of space and what space allows you to do is allows you to get inside the music with it and wear it and feel like it's you and kind of own it you take the let's perfect example we were talking about this today off we're open the wind album there's a song called rodeo that was a single for us on the record it's it's a good record the Chris LeDoux said it best he says the way that thing sounds alive that's rodeo right there and so he ran that come from him pretty cool but you're right the solos have to be less polite when you're playing it live has to grow some hair and the drummer the drummer has to be a freaking machine dynamics on a studio record up and down live those dynamics flatten out a little bit or if anything they just get louder and so yeah so two totally different players usually and the reason why is it's two totally different approaches so when you when you get used into town I asked me this real quick I feel like I remember we had heard or people said you came to town and then you left like one day what can you can you say why you turn around the left sure man you scared like all of us you know all of us have when you talk about guys and go man why is that guy so so not nice whatever ten times out of ten it's gonna be because he's scared we all are so I moved to this town scared like everybody moves here and really thought I was really naive to think someone would hear me say hey here's a million bucks go buy your folks a house and we'll what kind of record and you get here and I was hoping to find straw hats and gooseneck trailers will be you know cowboy USA and this is more the suit-and-tie part of it that was a little tough for me to handle because you know I handled a little bit of the business end of honky tonks we played back there but a guy named Tom Skinner in the group kind of handled more of that and Jed Lindsey those guys were good at that so when it came here I realized how alone I was mm-hm and left vowing to come back and I think the big difference when we came back was in the first day I met Stephanie Brown which in turn introduced me to Bob Doyle and Bob Dole is the reason why him and gods the reason why I'm sitting here today bob is one of the when I met Bob he was that a scout yes same with me and I was before you were here to kick the other brother the other room and kicks never changed either you know and in Bob is never changed he's always been the same nice guy that he was you back then so when you so you come to town you meet Bob what was the next thing people want to know you know what happened next you know well with Bob nothing happened next this was a this was a hard thing for me to understand while it was going down I met Bob and then I didn't hear anything from him for months and finally he reached back out to me and I said partner can you tell me why I haven't heard from you in a while he said I wanted to see if you were gonna stay it's good I was working three jobs he saw that I was hungry for it I didn't miss a writing appointment so he came to me and said hey man what'd you think about signing on as a publisher a publishing deal I said sure I don't know anything about him all I knew is it paid my rent three hundred bucks a month hell yeah what year was that 1988 so it's paying my rent I'm working now two other jobs plus a publishing job to just try and keep her head above water here and it's pretty good then from the publishing from the writing thing he decided hey I think we could go for an artist deal and that's when I told him I didn't come here to be an artist I came here to get much too young to feel this damn old cut by George Strait that was my that was my whole goal if that happened I'd drive back home bro Coleman and be happy that's what I thought so it came here and it was pretty cool when we were lucky enough to get inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame they told this story right and they said you know he came here not as an artist but as a but as a songwriter and wanted my George Strait to cut much too young to feel this demo he said so and you have no idea what's getting ready to happen over there because your wife and the Hall of Fame kind of planned it all and they said please make welcome to sing much too young for this demo George Strait I couldn't believe it my jaw fell on the ground here comes George he looked great and to hear George Strait seeing that one line a worn-out tape of Chris LeDoux my night was made it was good so that's I came to this town to try and be a songwriter and just wanted to get a song cut by George Strait it's still a goal I have yet to accomplish that I would love to accomplish so how what was it what was the next step so they got you in with Alan and then recording so Bob dual took me around to all there were seven major labels at the time and the seventh label all seven labels passed oh there was um no they felt like George Strait was already here because I got him Clint Black that was out that was just killing everything and I had an NSA I a Nashville Songwriters Association thing to do and I didn't want to do it because they'd all passed on miss there's no reason to do it Bob says you're gonna keep your word just go play the gig okay but what I'm going to do is I'm going to show up early in case somebody's not that I'm supposed to go on like fifth or seventh and in case somebody doesn't show up I'm getting early and I'm getting out of there sure enough Ralph's Murphy the Canadian artist he's in the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame he did not show up for that second thought and the producer of the show saw me and said hey man would you go on and Ralph's spicy you bet you won up there played was thinking I was getting ready to get out of there when Lynn Schultz from Capitol Records came up to Bob and said how did we leave this thing and Bob what he said and that next second chased everything what he should have said was you guys passed on us but what Bob said was Lynn you said you'd get back with us they had passed on us already and Lynn said you know what we might have missed something why are you bringing in so here goes so when we get our record deal the first guy I go to is a guy that's been mentoring me this whole time Jerry Kennedy because I know it's boy Brian and hanging around of course everybody knows Gordon because of the guitar work and the songwriting thing he does and then of course Shelby is already working his way into administration in this town so you knew the whole family and when we went over there to tell him we got signed by Capitol he said I'm out only what says I'm out on because me and those guys don't get along I said are you kidding me just know I said well I don't want to do this without you he says look they're gonna give you a list of about 10 names producers bring that list over to me when they do sure enough they gave me a list about 10 names he went over there circle them circle and circle him he said any of these guys can see you take it one of those five names he'd circled was Alan Reynolds Alan was the first guy that could see us so we went over to what was Jack's tracks at that time moved 16th and Horton Bob and I went upstairs talked to Alan when I came out the room I looked at Bob I said no offense the other guys but if that guy wants to take it on cuz that's a good dude you could just feel it when he met him and it was good and so that's how it began for us and Alan Reynolds was so sweet he said uh tell you what I'll produce three songs on the guy if the label doesn't like him I'll buy him I'll eat him they'll be gone and for somebody didn't have any money that was a big was a big huge step and I said thank you I'll take you up on that and it was cool and at first the first song we cut was not counting you which turned out to be the first song on the first album and the opening song of the first tour so that song as little attention as it gets played a huge role in our career Allen signed you or takes you in how did you get the g-men so Alan I've sending us we were talking about players I said Alan there's only one guy that's been on every session for me demos everything that I need is he he's the bass player and Alan kind of smiles at me and he says the only guy that I'm going to hold tight on is the bass player too I thought well we're dead and not I said it was my Chapman and he it's cool he spun his paper around push it over and in base he has my chain so that was a good thing right there that's when he told me about Mike has a brother from another mother kind of thing a guy named Milton sledge kind they breathe in breathe out together Muscle Shoals guys he says I use a guy named Chris loose injure on all the crystal stuff he says I really feel like he's got a sound that's untapped and can go a lot I can expand out a lot further that you want to go I said okay he said how about piano playing he says it's got to be Bobby would he said Bobby Woods got to touch the you like because you know you're doing kind of guitar demos with him he said I'm gonna try again named mark Kass Stephens on acoustic and we tried mark and he also liked Christopher Johnny Christopher and he also liked Pat Alger who was right in the building as a rider for him anyway and funny we ended up using Christopher and Alger on the thunder rolls and used Johnny Christopher unanswered prayers and then broadcast Stephens back to overdub on it and kind of stayed with cast evens from there forward and then the only guy that you know had left were the two specialty guys Steele and fiddle and he'd brought in Buddy Spiker buddy spike was a great guy but Rob had done all of our demos of course and so he said you want to give your guy a chance I said I'd love to Rob came in and Alan just fell in love with him they communicated very well come to find out Rob is classically trained talk about a hillbilly fiddler but he's classically trained so him and Alan work on perfect wavelength and then Bruce bouton steel player he had done some stuff for Kathy Mattea which Alan was doing as well and he said this cat's got a really kind of a smooth style and he can play all kinds of Steel styles from western swing straight country and he's from the east he's from Virginia so he also knows the Appalachian stuff and stuff too so it was cool man and that was the assemblance of the g-man the seven guys one of the most important one though was the guy that sent the board there's Mark Miller mm-hmm and Mark was just somebody that that how and found that loved music was a guitar player himself and a good one but they got along great and Allen trusted marks hearing from Mike miking stuff and also his his specialty was mixing man unbelievable mixer and Allen would never let him use automation so he had to play his board like the guys played their instrument so when we all sit up here on the stage I looked around and said this is good that all these guys were included I forgot one guy in the whole thing that should have been in with the g-men because without without this person my sound would not be what it was I looked right at her in his Tricia she sang on over 77 songs of ours of the first hundred once so she has been that Garth sound forever that's that harmony that's that sound and that's the only regret I had from that night was she should have been in on it because man background vocalists and even though she's an artist or so background vocals like Patty Loveless is defense mmm you don't get to where you're at without those singers on those voices same way you don't get to where you're at without those guitar players those drummers so that was my only miss for the night but that's the g-men including Mark Miller and Alan Reynolds and just I'm lucky to have known them in a pretty damn good time for us and for country music I think everybody feels the same way when you came in the night we did your benefit for the kids yes that was he said you just walked in you kept walked in the back door you said um have you seen stardom 10 feet from story on 10 feet yeah you were talking about those thing or ting that was everything that's everything mana that's why I love the movie Ray Ray showed you exactly what the difference was and that difference is what get you in the door you know you got to carry the ball from there and hopefully there are people that'll help you if not you're dead but that reference those guys that were willing to play those licks on not counting you that whole start pounding down and uh very non-traditional country but became very traditional country from that all the way to the dance that record was a big variation fences would come and fences be even more of a variation from thunder rolls to wolves and everything in between so these guys were pushed to the limit to recreate themselves and reinvent themselves and I think they answered the call brilliantly when we come back just a second I want to talk about to dance good see in a second the musicians Hall of Fame and Museum has been celebrating the men and women who make the music of our lives since 2006 the musicians Hall of Fame is the one and only Museum in the world that honors the talented musicians who played on the greatest recordings of all time it's a music video it's and where else you gonna get the Casio the cuts are in this room the Grammy Museum gallery at the musicians Hall of Fame is an interactive facility that allows guests to explore the process of making a recording take drum lessons with ringo starr sing onstage with Ray Charles write a song with Desmond Child rap with Nelly or be Garth Brooks in our recording studio experience located in the heart of downtown Nashville in the first floor of the historic Nashville Municipal Auditorium come see what you've heard at the musicians Hall of Fame and Museum hi i'm tyler rudesheim director of events at the musicians Hall of Fame and Museum located within the historic Nashville meanness wada tour iam the musicians Hall of Fame and Museum is one of the most unique spaces in downtown Nashville offering a versatile environment that caters to events of all sizes your guests will love this truly national experience we specialize in corporate dinners music industry events receptions and more contact me today to book your next event welcome back to musicians Hall of Fame backstage with Garth Brooks Garth we were we finished talking about the dream Inn for a minute here but you mentioned the dance which is just it's not just a mother song I mean it crossed every boundary people have used it for so many different moments in their lives you know and it is so true and it's such a great song I want some of that something also on what do you what how did you find that song and what what makes you pick a song what what is it thou did you know what song is going to be a hit you've had a pretty good track record of picking them well Alan Reynolds always Bob Doyle the greatest song men ever but it's a pretty simple thing and I think being normal might be one of the most special gifts you can ever ask for being the guy next door might be a superpower for a guy like me because if you like it if it hits you then hopefully you'll like it he'll like it everybody will like it so that's that's I think that's the deal I got lucky really off the top for people to show me hey if you like it we like it and so I just started doing things that I liked so I'm at the Bluebird Cafe Tony errata is playing and Tony errata starts the dance oh wow so I come up to him I said man I don't if I ever get a record deal I love I'd love to hold that song and you know a sweet we got a record deal I called him up he let me put it on hold and then I never knew this till 30 years later when we were doing the anthologies it's the first song he ever got cut and I thought Tony errata had had a million songs cut in this town so that was cool but the dance is the perfect picture that shows the difference between a studio player and a live player Bobby wood created the dance one time pass done but Bobby wood could never play it again because that's his job he just comes up with the licks goes on here's the next song but in front of you come up the licks so Bobby Wood is petrified to play the beginning of the dance in front of an audience because he's done it once and that's usually what a studio guy does where a road guy thrives on it because he knows they're gonna come alive when I played these notes and I'm gonna be Superman but a studio guy played it once let's move on let's go make some other records so he said Reggie Jung said that he said he was with the highwayman and he said you know they asked me to go on the road with him I had to go back and learn what I had made up I didn't know you know and he said it was hard it's very hard because you can't mess it up yeah that's the thing in studio guys see you guys if they mess it up oh let me take that again but live guys you get one shot in and as it goes by and these people what I love about what people describe is fans what I love about them I'm a fan and I know the solo of my favorite song like I know the lyric of my favorite song so when you step up to play it I want to hear it played that way but just a little more angst in it a little more muscle in it that's habla of Tom Petty's band a they played everything like they did on the record yep except like you said it might have just a little more gas you stay home and listen to the records so give me just a little more sure girl give me a little more cheese let it taste even sweeter than it is when I go over the records you just use your gut feeling for for a song just if it touches you you feel like you have the ears of the public yeah there's no acquit because the second you start putting math of this thing it's going to go down the second you start trying to chase something like you alternative or burrow country these guys have got to be who they are so let them do that that's not your thing my thing is just I don't know Garth music whatever that is kind of a mix between George Strait we're so do James Taylor Boston Queen Fogelberg all these all these things buck Merle George all these ingredients are in what gave you the I mean to be son took in an airplay on country radio pretty much that was so bill ballsy thing to do to fly over the audience and you know and all this stuff that you'd see at a rock concert but it was they wanted it and I you know another thing try to remember that before you ever do this you're a fan so I'm a fan of country music so I know what I want to hear on the other than speakers I'm also a fan of live concerts so I know what I want George Strait can walk out there I can stare at him all night seeing every word of him he's fine in the other hardest I'm probably going to get bored with it right George gets away with it I worship him right so you go see Seeger Seeger now even though he's like in his 70s now left side of stage fright side the stage he's all over the place played piano playing guitar there so your guy I love Seeger go to Bruno Mars Bruno Mars gonna lay down some dance and you're gonna feel like the squares widest guy in the building and you're gonna have a great time you know so it's it's pretty cool of knowing what you come there for and I think people come to the Garth show to sing like they're the only person in the building to watch these people close their eyes and they flail their arms and the people around them are doing this because they're just having the best time it's the greatest thing that you could ask for being a musician on stage our whole staff and thanks for taking care of us at the last concert here and yes and I've never seen anybody command an audience the way that you do and the things you just said a minute I think everybody there thought that you were their friend and you probably do know probably half on my own yeah I remember half their names because I've never many buddies names like you know can tell you what they are right though I am their friend and I am the most grateful guy in the building hopefully when people go what do you want for your legacy I want people to think that I really was thankful for what I got to do because you watch this business before you ever get in it it comes and goes quick how did you even have the guts to leave and I mean you know the guts to leave what Oklahoma well not Oklahoma but just leave what you had here and then come back oh well you know what you raised your kids the retirement pay yeah I mean and then and then it came back and it didn't it's like it's kind of when the Eagles left I mean they're bigger than they wore I think you're bigger than you wore when you left do you not feel that way people are awfully sweet to us man they they they let us play the new stuff they come there for the old stuff and then they make you feel like the new stuff sounds like the old stuff for them so it's it's a sweet gift to give yes they were louder than they were in the 90s they were crazier than they were in the 90s they knew the music better than they did in the 90s and I just had to pinch yourself going this can't be happening so so we feel very very lucky that that our second time around has been a sweet if much sweeter than the first time you know the thing is we did an exclusive deal with Walmart at a time in our career and in one sit are you crazy I said no Walmart does 80 something percent of all country music sales I would be crazy if I was going to a company that did 20% right so it's not crazy so when people go were you crazy to retire at the end of the 90s where the 90s were everything to us so no if you've ever been a parent there's nothing better than being with your kids nothing so I wasn't leaving something to step down or sacrificing I left and I got to step up and if that offends people I'm sorry but that's if you've ever been a parent there's nothing better than that and all the arenas the football stadiums are selling out like in record time yeah and I never thought a stadium could be as warm as an arena they were thought arena could be as warm as a honky-tonk but you saw them but now to get to be touring with the love of your life with your best buddies that were from college on and people are showing up and showing up in the way they're showing up more than ever man that's a that's a lucky man that lucky man's name is mr. Yearwood man again I I wouldn't I would sit here for for a week if you would but I've enjoyed myself I've I really can't tell you again how much I truly appreciate everything that you've done on camera and off and and I just want to thank you again I can't tell you how much I appreciate it thank you man I know I speak on behalf of all these guys Thank You Man thank you for trading your life and your family's life cuz they're everywhere to make sure light shines on these guys that have been put in the dark something because they're not the head honcho in the bunch but there are no head honchos without these guys see you next week on musicians Hall of Fame backstage [Applause]

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