One Tip To Improve Your Creativity – Drum Lesson (Drumeo)

One Tip To Improve Your Creativity – Drum Lesson (Drumeo)


(guitar, bass, drums) – Hey gang, JP Bouvet here
with my band, Childish Japes. We’ve got Ashur Kurtz on
guitar, Jed Lingot on bass, we’re here at Drumeo, and we’ve just filmed
a bunch of great videos for both their drum
educational site, as well as their new
guitarlessons.com site, so it’s been a
productive couple days, and in this video, I want to share
with you a concept that helps us push our
creative boundaries a lot, because this band writes a lot, we jam a lot in our
writing sessions, and we’re trying to
always think of new ways, especially as a trio, to give things a unique twist,
and fill up a lot of sound with just three people. So this is one method
that we’ve found has been extremely helpful. So the idea is establishing
and changing roles in the band, because there are
sort of standard roles that the drummer tends to play, and that the bass
player tends to play, and that the guitar
player tends to play. Those roles are important, especially when we start
learning the instrument, because we need to have
some sort of framework to work within as we start
to develop our coordination. But what I’m talking about, let’s just run through
a handful of these sort of basic rules, and then what we’re
going to do is break pretty much all of them, and we’re going to take a
fairly boring common groove as a trio, and turn it into
something that we think is quite interesting. So let’s start with the drums. Typically we’ve got the hi hat, the right hand playing time, and just keeping the metronome. We got the back beat on two
and four with the left hand. And then we’ve got
the kick drum playing whatever the pattern is that
one of those guys is playing. So that’s kind of the standard
thing with the drum set. With the bass, they
get kind of locked into playing the roots, and
playing the same rhythms that the guitar player plays if he brought an
idea to the table. And then, usually Mister
Guitar is handling the chords, or the melody of
whatever’s going on. So first we’re going to play an example that follows
all those rules. So Jed’s gonna play the
bass line, the roots, Ash will handle the melody, and I’m going to follow all
the standard groove rules, of right hand metronome,
left hand backbeat, kick drum plays along with Jed, and let’s see what
it sounds like. (playing instruments) Okay, so there’s nothing wrong with the groove we just played, especially if you’re
a beginning drummer, or instrumentalist, that might be the extent
of your coordination, and that’s fine. You’re working on your groove, and you’re working
on pushing things a little bit at a time. But what we want
to do now as a band is switch up the roles here, and change things up in a way
that is much more uncommon, and it’s going to
accidentally result in some pretty interesting,
an interesting different take on that same melody and chords
that we were just playing. So between us, Jed’s gonna
handle the chords and melody, which is typically
what a guitar player might typically do. Ash is gonna essentially
become a percussion instrument. And I’m gonna play, I
can’t play the bass here, because I only have two notes that are probably out of tune, but I’m going to handle
lower frequencies here, and I’m going to sort of
set a rhythmic foundation that a bass player
might typically have
the role of doing. So, why don’t we, why don’t we play each
part individually, and then we’ll put
it all together and we’ll see how
it sounds together. So Jed, what are you playing? (bass playing) Yeah, Asher? (guitar playing) So yeah, that’s
super percussive, even when you think about
the various hand percussions that you can change pitch
of by squeezing the strings, or whatever, that’s a very percussion-ish
type of guitar part. And the groove that I’m
gonna end up playing is… (drumming) So for me the left hand’s
still playing the back beat, that’s still playing
a traditional role, but my right hand now, instead
of being a time keeper, which no one needs, because Ashur’s kind of
serving that purpose, I’m just playing an
interesting rhythm that’s gonna serve as the
foundation of this groove in the low end. I can’t change notes, really, but I can fill in the low end, which Jed would typically
have that job of, so, let’s put it all together. (playing together) Nice, as you can see, just us redefining those roles, and trading roles a little bit forces us to think in
a more creative way. It’s gonna push you out
of your comfort zone and out of your box, and I think that’s pretty
much always a good thing, if you’re trying to be creative. So, my challenge for you, is if you’re
playing with a band, if you have an opportunity
to jam with even one friend who plays a
different instrument, and if you don’t, even
playing along to music, because if you’re
listening to music, and they already have a
drum part in the song, that gives you kind of free rein to think of a new creative part and push yourself out of
that typical drummer zone, and say, okay, what if I
think of a melodic thing, or what if I do what a
percussion player might do? Or do what a bass
player might do? So my challenge for you is to, in whatever
setting you can, try to change up the roles, not only within the drum set, but with your bandmates,
or your jam mates, and see what comes from it. And that song that
we just played there, is actually from
our first album. The song is called “Gorbas,” and the album is called
“After You’re Born.” So if you want to find
that Childish Japes album, it’s everywhere on
Spotify, iTunes, you can find us on
Instagram, Facebook, everywhere you find
people and things, and huge thanks to Drumeo
for having us here. We’ve had an awesome time. And thank you for
watching, see you soon.

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