Photographers in Focus: Wim Wenders

Photographers in Focus: Wim Wenders


Everything you do is made from ideas Everything you do Every movie starts with a certain idea It would start with a place you see And the Polaroid was just a collection
of constant ideas It was lovely that then they were there,
and you couldn’t really forget them I mean, you could throw them away
or you could give them away but it was a constant prolongation
of your memory My very first Polaroid camera
was a very simple one, mid-’60s I was 20 and I used Polaroid cameras exclusively until I was about 35 or so Most of them I gave away
because when you took Polaroids people were always greedy
and wanted them because they’re liked There was an object.
It was a singular thing So, two-thirds of the Polaroids
I ever took, I probably gave away Eventually they ended up all
in wooden boxes and weren’t seen anymore
for 30 or 40 years They were very insightful into the process
of my first six, seven movies All the movies I did through the ’70s I shot lots of Polaroids in preparation
in doing the films And there they were, all these shoots,
sort of like an open book There was something almost a little
sacred about each of these pictures because they were the proof of that moment and they were true The idea that it was one of a kind
and that you produced it once and there was a truth in it You couldn’t fuck with it You couldn’t manipulate it You couldn’t add other colors
or all the things you do now I mean, Polaroid was the bloody truth It was unmanipulatable The Polaroid had an uncanny
relationship to your unconscious It’s almost like your body did the picture Polaroids were never so exact
about the framing and you didn’t really care about that It was about the act
and about the immediacy of it And it’s almost a subconscious act And then it became something real And that makes it such a window
into your soul as well If you want it or not, this is you

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