Postcards: Printmaker, Art Camp & Creamery

Postcards: Printmaker, Art Camp & Creamery


– [Voiceover] The
following program   is a production of
Pioneer Public Television.   (pleasant theme music)   This program on Pioneer
Public Television   is funded by   The Minnesota Arts and
Cultural Heritage Fund   with money from the
vote of the people   of Minnesota on
November 4th, 2008.   Additional support provided by   Mark and Margaret Yackel-Juleen   in honor of Shalom Hill farm.   A non-profit rural
education retreat center   in a beautiful prairie
setting near Windom   in Southwestern Minnesota.   shalomhillfarm.org.   The Arrowwood Resort
and Conference Center,   your ideal choice
for Minnesota resorts   offering luxury townhomes,
18 holes of golf,   darling reflection spa,
big splash water park   and much more.   Alexandria, Minnesota,
a relaxing vacation   or great location for an event.   ExploreAlex.com   “Easy to get to, hard to leave.”   – My name is David
KelseyBassett.   Hip-hop music, when
I first heard it,   I was just enamored by it.   I was in junior high.   And Michael Jackson
was very popular.   He was a moonwalker.   I learned how to moonwalk.   And then I kind of gravitated
towards hip-hop music   at a very early
age, as a dancer.   And as I got older,   I got into other parts
of hip-hop culture.   DJing and MCing.   And never really got into
graffiti or street art,   but I always been into
fine art, minimalism.   I’m in a hip-hop
group that is called,   Sifu Hotman.   And I do the production for it.   It’s kind of a boom-bap
style of hip-hop to it.   Guante is one of the rappers,   and he’s known for being
a two-time national   poetry slam champion.   And he also does workshops
around the nation   as a spoken word artist.   And he’s very conscience   and a community activist rapper.   The other rapper in
the group is Dem Atlas.   And he’s very new, but
he’s got a lot of buzz   around his name now.   Because, just a few months ago,   the Minnesota
powerhouse record label   called Rhymesayers Entertainment   picked him up as their
newest artist signing.   And so our project
predates that.   And we’re continuing
the project this year.   So it’ll kind of be a
prelude to Dem Atlas’s album   which will come out
later on in the fall.   So those two are the rappers,   and then I’m the producer.   And the DJ, we have kind
of a throwback sound.   Mostly from my production,   and the style and the content   that Guante and Dem Atlas
provide with their lyrics.   Taking it back to the
early days of hip-hop,   DJ’s really didn’t have money   to afford expensive gear.   So, what they did have
is some turntables   and they would find
particular parts of a record,   a break, a drum break.   And they would get two
copies of the record   and with the turntables then,   if you’re using your cue,   you can extend the break
to three minutes long.   And create your own music.   So, that’s kind of the
way the music that I make   is based off a very classic
kind of hip-hop production   and hip-hop performance.   When Guante and
Dem and I perform,   I have two turntables
and I am rocking beats,   scratching, adding some
parts during the hooks,   cutting them in
on the turntable.   It’s a record for DJ’s
with little sound effects   that have become legendary.   Classic, whatever
you wanna call it.   (jazz scatting music)   (record scratching)   When the Sifu Hotman
project came about,   I wanted to design
an album cover art   that looked as
accurate as the music   that people heard.   I wanted what they see to match   what they were listening to.   And what they’re listening to   is boom-bap hip-hop music.   In the style of
the 80’s and 90’s.   And so the cover
work, the cover art,   is an homage to
that era of flyers,   hip-hop party flyers
from the Bronx.   So it’s got that element to it.   Because it’s got an element
of party to the music.   The cover art, I
wanted it to be gritty.   And I wanted to do it
myself, if I could.   So that got me to thinking   that I could screen
print it myself.   I’ve done screen printing
in the past a little bit,   and I’m knowledgeable
enough to know   that people screen
print album covers.   And you can do it on the cheap.   So I thought, I’ll do it myself.   And that will just
add to the uniqueness   and the authenticity
of the project.   So I decided to screen
print the album cover art   for the Sifu Hotman project.   And that was how I first really   got into screen printing.   The reason why I like
screen printing so much   is because it’s inexpensive,   and you can make multiples.   So if you want to share
your work with people,   screen printing is a
great way to do it.   So the process of screen
printing is very simple.   There’s a handheld squeegee   that rests on top of a frame,   which has a screen, screen mesh   depending on what you’re doing,   it’ll have different
mesh counts to it.   If it’s t-shirts or
if it’s photographs,   or if it’s line art.   Those things will
make a difference   to what kind of mesh
you’ll want to use.   But, it really is
just a squeegee   on top of the mesh, pulling
ink across a substrate.   The substrate can be paper.   It can be clothing.   It can be hats.   Most anything can be
screen printed on.   That’s another appeal to me.   One of the things that
comes out in my art   is a sense of isolation.   I’ve lived in the area
for most of my life,   but for a portion of my life,   I’ve lived in Minneapolis,
I lived in New York City,   and I really like the hustle
and bustle of the city   and the things that
the city offers.   So, being out in
rural Minnesota again,   the feeling of
isolation inspires me   in kind of surprising ways.   I like the dichotomy.   I like to bring aspects of
the city to a rural setting   for a collage piece.   A piece I’m doing for the   Commerce and Consumption
Gallery showing   I’m calling, Post No Bales.   It began as photographs.   A photograph of a
Post No Bills sign   that if you’re in a bigger
city like New York City,   you’ll see them all over   as you walk along the streets.   Post No Bills, they
don’t want folks   to be putting up
advertisements on their walls.   So it’s a very typical
thing you’ll see   in New York City.   They don’t want graffiti.   They don’t want other
folks trying to sell things   on their walls.   That, superimposed
on a hay bale.   A hay bale, rural.   From rural Minnesota actually,   about a mile and a
half from my home.   And so it’s the dichotomy
of the two ideas.   I think is a little bit
snarky, a little bit funny   and speaks a little
bit about the changes   in rural society with
some of the influence   of the city being piped in   through the internet
and television.   So it’s kind of a
piece that is trying   to live in two worlds.   I think it’s funny, it’s got
an aspect of humor to it.   But it also is a nice
metaphor for our times.   I’m David KelseyBassett.   I am a Screen Printer.   I am also a DJ for a rap
group called Sifu Hotman.   The music that I
make is minimalist,   boom-bap hip-hop.   And the screen
printing that I do,   and the fine art that
I am in love with   is also minimalistic.   (peaceful rock music)   – The elementary kids
that don’t get a lot   of opportunity to
do art at school.   Because there’s so
many other things   they have to do.   They get music, but
sometimes that’s about it.   The teachers will bring in
a project here and there,   but it’s not a real
focus on arts education.   And there are lots of children   who just really gravitate
towards the arts.   And I also believe that the arts   are a way for
children to develop   incredible skills
beyond just the art   that they make.   But life skills, and art
makes us all more human.   And we need it for our society.   So, we want it fill that need.   So, every year, we’ve
managed to pull together   local artists.   We always focus on the
prairie in some way.   This year, we’re just
imagining the prairie.   The idea of what could it be,   what is it now, what
would you like it to be.   How would you like
to decorate it,   anything like that.   – The camp is
called Prairie Camp.   It’s put on by the Prairie
Renaissance Cultural Alliance.   The first day, they made books.   And did a lesson on creative
writing and drawing.   For our field trip that
we took the next day   up to the horticulture gardens,   where they were encouraged
to write and draw   what they would think the
prairie would look like   10 to 15, 20 years from now.   Or what it used to look
like a hundred years   before we were even here.   Because our whole
theme this week   has been, Imagine the Prairie.   And we’re encouraging
them to think   outside of what they see.   – Yesterday, when we
went out to the turbines,   with Troy Goodnough and   I learned so much about
how there was like   a mile up of ice,
where we were standing.   How tall the grass was.   That the only living tree,   was like three miles away.   It was a lot of fun.   – I always learn from the kids.   It’s always fun
to work with them   and see their
reaction to something.   The best thing about pulling
a print off the press   is lifting the paper
to see what you got.   And to see their
reaction, it’s almost like   when I first started doing it.   I had that reaction
for the first time.   That’s kind of what I wanted   was to be a kid
again, sometimes.   – I really like think
this is my favorite class   because it’s like I can do
whatever I want on these.   They’re really fun.   (offscreen)
-You get to be
creative.   – Yeah.   At my house, if I get
creative at my house,   I’m in time-out.   This is one of my
favorite camps,   because I can get together   with a bunch of my
friends instead of like   just sitting down watching
TV and stuffing popcorn.   And I can just have
fun and run around.   And they do a little
skit at the end   which is just a lot of fun.   I just love this camp.   It’s one of my favorites,   because I can just
be myself and stuff.   The moment of truth.   – Drum roll.   Nice print.   Nice print, I like that.   – Well, what I like
about Prairie Camp   is seeing what the
children create.   And to see the enthusiasm
that they have.   And the attention that
they give to their teachers   to learn new things.   And then they turn
it back around   and apply it right away.   The kids are just wonderful.   And we have a really great group   of kids again this year.   – I think it’s a great situation   to be able to teach
classes like this.   To have art organizations
like the PRCA   to be able to have a venue
to teach kids like this.   And introduce them to music,   and other things that they
might not see at this age.   Obviously, a lot of them
had never print make before.   Or done works on paper,   so they were really receptive
to be able to do that.   And I think it’s great to
have the legislation funds,   the grants to be able to
do something like this.   Actually see our dollars go back   into investments in our kids.   Things like that.   The more they’re
introduced to artwork,   artforms, creative
things, music, anything.   It helps them be more
rounded individuals.   The earlier you
catch that with them   the more it’s imprinted.   The more they push
their creativeness,   and they keep their
creativeness too.   – I love it here.   (offscreen )
– Why do you love it here?   – Because it’s really fun.   Because you get to
do lots of activites   and all sorts of stuff.   Like, we get coloring books
in the room over there.   That’s why.   And today, we played
musical chairs.   I was just starting to
get a little used to it   the first time.   Because I had to go
out the first time,   but then I was getting to–I
got only to two chairs.   But I lost when it
was only one chair.   – I put these on too
oily and I was rolling it   and then all the
flowers got stuck   on one of the rollers.   So I pick them up and
that’s why my fingers   are all crazy.   But they’re more crazy people.   I just had to wash them off.   But, yesterday I got
paint all over my face.   And everyone was like, “What
happened to your face?”   And I said, “Art.”   (cheerful music)   (mellow guitar music)   – It was actually when
I was probably 17,   I went on a trip during my
senior year of high school.   I went on the National
Dairy 4-H Conference   to Wisconsin.   And they always hold it during   World Dairy Expo.   And we visited a series   of different dairy
related businesses.   And one of those
happened to include   a farmstead cheese operation.   And it was four brothers,
who pipelined the milk   right underneath the road
over to their cheese plant.   And I thought it was
the coolest thing   that they were milking
the cows in the morning,   and had cheese ready in
the afternoon to try.   I came home and was like,   “Mom and dad, this is
what we have to do.   “This is the
coolest thing ever.”   And I thought it would
be a really cool way   for me and my siblings possibly   to have an avenue
of coming back home   without having to expand
the dairy necessarily,   but be able to build
with the cheese plant.   Most girls at 17 are
thinking about boys   and where they
might go to college   or what fashion is
hot that time of year,   but I was really just interested   in learning more about cheese.   And how I’m going to make
this end up being my life.   And, I really didn’t
think about it that hard   or realize at the time
how big of a deal it was   that I knew what I wanted to do.   I kind of revolved
my life around cheese   ever since then.   And studied dairy food quality   at the University of Minnesota.   But I really focused
on Food Marketing   when I was at the U.   A lot of cheesemakers
told me that,   “You can make good cheese,   “but it’s really hard to
sell it or market it.”   – How did Alise and I meet?   Well, we know we first met   in the Junior
Holstein Association.   And we had known each
other through that,   and obviously, you guys
have seen Alise by now.   She was way out of my
league at the time.   And in college, I tricked
her and coerced her   into dating me.   Basically, we really
got into cheese   because even though
I wasn’t convinced   this could be our future.   We moved to Vermont right
after I graduated college.   Alise had a job that she
enjoyed but didn’t love.   She still wanted to get
back to cheesemaking.   And I took a job with that
same Holstein association   where Alise and I first
met out in Vermont.   So, just 48 hours after
I said “I do” to Alise,   we got married just
a few miles away   from where we’re sitting
here at Redhead Creamery.   And we moved to Vermont.   And so, we’re by ourselves.   We’re 22 and 23 years
old out in Vermont.   No family, no friends.   So we basically took a
honeymoon every single weekend.   And Vermont is a
hotbed, and actually,   all of New England is a
hotbed for artisan stuff.   But Vermont is especially a
hotbed for artisan cheese.   And has dozens of cheesemakers   who’ve been making cheese
for a couple decades   or some less.   But we were able to go, learn,   steal lots of ideas.   After two years in Vermont,   I was longing to get
back on dairy farms.   With my job, being in
government relations,   I was in a lot of meeting rooms,   but I wasn’t getting on
farms as much as I wanted.   And I had interned with a
dairy magazine in college   that I’d always
wanted to get back to.   And that opportunity
came up, and we did.   It just so happens that
that dairy magazine   is located 15 miles
or 20 miles away   from where Alise
first fell in love   with the idea of
farmstead cheesemaking.   So, we again swindled her way   into getting a job there.   And they were great
people to work with.   And so we lived
right in the middle   of my job and her job.   And both were, at
least at the time,   what we thought was
living our dream.   – After that, I was pregnant
with our daughter Lucy.   And, we decided
that we wanted her   to be growing up on the farms.   So, she’s actually
only three weeks old   before we moved back home.   And it’s been just a
little over two years now   that we’ve been back home.   And we’re very family-oriented,   and I really enjoyed that.   And I wanted to be
able to instill that   on my current family,
future family.   And, give my daughter
the opportunity   to experience that as well.   Lucy does go to daycare,
but she still has   this experience of
dealing with people.   And, she’ll know where
her food is coming from.   How it’s made and I think
that’s a really cool   opportunity for her   and any future
children we may have.   And anyone that we bring here.   I wouldn’t be able
to do what I’m doing   without the support
of my parents.   They have basically been there   through the entire process,   from me saying I
wanna make cheese   to encouraging me
through the classes   that I didn’t necessarily
do well in college,   like chemistry or other things.   But they were always
there supporting me   and encouraging me
to keep learning.   I just really wouldn’t
have been able to do it   without their support.   And I really appreciate
what they’ve done for us   so far and continue to do.   – Did we have
hiccups? Did we ever.   So we started getting
permitting for this plant   in June and July of 2013.   And at the time, we thought,   “Wow is going to be a breeze.   “We’ll be up and
running by January 1st.   “And be shipping out
our first cheeses   “by Memorial Day 2013.”   Well, we didn’t really
start making cheese   in earnest until
Halloween of 2014.   So six months after we hoped.   A couple of things held us back,   we had a really hard
winter last winter.   So obviously, our
construction workers   did their best, but
it was cold outside.   And everybody works
a little slower.   July 4th, we tried
making cheese.   Things weren’t hooked up right.   Later in July, we
tried making cheese,   and again we wrecked the vat.   And had to send it
back to Green Bay   for almost two months
in August and September.   And then it just came back   and had it set up for Halloween.   So finally, six months later,   we’ve been able to be going.   And we’ve been going
for, knock on wood,   three weeks straight
now with no problems.   And we think we’ve done
everything we could   to prevent it.   One of the really cool
things that happened   by us being delayed,
through all this process.   If we would’ve
started up in July,   we probably just would’ve
started making cheese   and called it good and
tried to find a wholesaler   and go from there.   But since we had a
few extra months,   we were able to make the
store and event room.   Which has literally
saved us, allowed us   to have something for
people to come look at   even when we didn’t have
cheese a few months ago.   And didn’t know if we were
ever going to get cheese.   We could still
schedule events here.   So we’ve hosted things like
a cheese and wine tasting,   painting and cupcake day   with one of our
friends from Morris.   And we hope to do lots more
cheese education classes.   So now we’re able to do that,   and put it all
together when Alise   is actually talking about
what equipment she’s using   she could show them
exactly what equipment   she’s using to make the cheese.   – Do I ever get sick of cheese?   No, I don’t think I ever will.   From quality assurance testing   while we’re making cheese   to my dinner tonight
will probably   involve cheese of some occasion.   I feel like if you
surround yourself   with good people.   Your life is that much more
pleasant and enjoyable.   I wanted to deal with
something, cheese especially,   just makes people happy.   I don’t know anyone
that gets upset   from having really good
cheese and wine or beer.   And it’s just a really fun–   it’s a fun culture
and experience.   The people in this
industry are just awesome.   They’re all very sharing,   and want to communicate with you   and help you when you struggle.   I text cheesemakers that
I know on a regular basis   just asking for help.   Because, I don’t always
know what I’m doing,   so it’s a really cool industry.   And it’s really fun to be
part of multiple aspects   of the dairy industry
that not everyone   gets to have a part of.   – [Voiceover] This program   on Pioneer Public
Television is funded by   The Minnesota Arts and
Cultural Heritage Fund   with money from the vote
of the people of Minnesota   on November 4th, 2008.   Additional support, provided by,   Mark and Margaret Yackel-Juleen.   In honor of Shalom Hill Farm,   a non-profit rural
education retreat center   in a beautiful prairie
setting near Windam   in Southwestern Minnesota.   Shalomhillfarm.org.   The Arrowwood Resort
and Conference Center,   your ideal choice for
Minnesota resorts.   Offering luxury townhomes,
18 holes of golf,   darling reflection spa,
big splash water park,   and much more.   Alexandria, Minnesota.   A relaxing vacation
or great location   for an event.   ExploreAlex.com.   “Easy to get to, hard to leave.”   (pleasant theme music)  

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