‘The Adjacent Possible’: Abstract relationships

‘The Adjacent Possible’: Abstract relationships


[Elizabeth Mead] The name of the
exhibition is ‘The Adjacent Possible,’ and I took the name from the theoretical
biologist Stuart Kauffman, who, when talking about creative
potential, talks about one thing begetting another. In other words, you walk into a room, you expect maybe that there will be
three windows but there are four, and you decide to look out the fourth
window and you find something that you
could not have anticipated. The reason that I chose that was because
I was interested in work that didn’t
silo itself. So, in other words, all of the artists in
this show have a discipline that they
originate in, but they leave that discipline often. I would really feel like I’ve done
something right if, when people come in, rather than
feeling like they had to get it– ’cause I think that’s one of the
dificulties, people think, ‘I’ve got to get the
message, I’ve got to get the thing,’– is to just let the work reveal itself. You know, we have this expectation,
particularly now with things like
Wikipedia, that you can walk in and in a moment you
can suss it up and be out the door. This is work that takes time, and it’s
meant to reveal itself over time. I think when a work of art is really doing
its job is when you come back to it
year after year, and you’re able to have a conversation
with it, you know, you’re able to see something
that perhaps you didn’t see the last time. Not that the work itself is changing,
but your ability to see, your acquaintance
with it is growing and increasing. We get to know people over a lifetime. I think we get to know works of art over
a lifetime. And so my hope is that we begin to erase
some of the perceived barriers that
abstraction can sometimes put forth.

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